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overtheedge
20:31:48 Mon
Oct 22 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Though I know little about labor contracts, it is my understanding that all contracts must have penalty clauses on each party for non-compliance. But thinking I understand is NOT the same as knowing I understand.

All of the above postings is the the basis for my plans to keep my operations as one-man shows.

If I were to consider a second person, the most important would be a camp manager. They would set their own schedule as long as the basics are there when needed. The stew is in the pot and biscuits in the bread safe, serve yourself. Coffee in the thermos.

I admit that at my age and after a long day's work, it is tedious to take care of all the domestic needs. Things aren't so bad when the water is hot. A warm tent and chair is bliss after a day working in the driving rain.

So you really wanna placer mine? Or just be a laborer?
eric

  
geowizard
22:10:11 Mon
Oct 22 2012

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Because of the regulatory clime today, many business leaders are opting out. The regulatory compliance issues surrounding a small one-man operation become significant as soon as you mention the word "machine".

A single miner or many miners may work together on a mining project. Without a "machine", the hand-digging miners have little to worry about except their limited physical endurance. Physical endurance has a limit. We can take one man or woman and draw a circle around him or her and define the extent of the placer mining that is possible. We have covered that aspect of placer mining.

Man vs Machine:

Machines provide "mechanical advantage". Simple mechanical advantage in the form of levers and pulleys are one thing. As soon as powered (motorized) machinery arrive, the game changes. Can we draw a circle around what a man with a machine can do? Yes.

Placer mining can be defined as a process where money, manpower, material, space and time are expended toward something that we all agree is "good". There is something "good" about gold!:smile:

Ever see an Alaska Chicken Forum? I've never looked for a Forum on other commodities - all of which are good and probably equally important. Why do some chicken farmers settle with a few chickens and a rooster and others will settle for nothing less than a thousand?

The difference between raising one chicken and two chickens is the input doubles and the output doubles.

Placer mining is different!

A bigger loader burns more fuel but still only requires one operator. The amount of material moved divided by the cost increases significantly. A Cat D8N and a Cat 235 excavator with a 100 KW power plant and 3000 GPM pump will burn 100 gallons of fuel per day. The washplant capacity is scaled appropriately at 150 cu yds per hour. The crew requirement is two.

Fuel cost goes down because you can fly in 3000 gallons of fuel at a time @ $7.00 per gallon. You write a check for $21,000. every thirty days. Pay checks remain the same. Wifi, cost of bacon and beans remains the same.

Capacity goes up to 1500 cubic yards a day.

15 x .7 x .8 = $8,400 per day = $252,000 per month.

Less: $21,000 fuel, $12,000 labor, $9,000 lunch meat and beans. = $210,000 net.

To get there, a placer miner needs something called an "Investor"!

The Capital equipment cost will run $500K for a used D8N, Excavator, MSI washplant, Pump and Genset.

In a 50-50 investor Return on Investment (ROI) = $300K per 90 day season. Mine owner gets the same.

The $30K remainder goes into repair fund.

The investor would probably be in the game for three or four seasons depending on the negotiated settlement.

Investors often prefer gold rather than FRN.

- Geowizard

  
hoppingforpay
02:48:23 Tue
Oct 23 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

After 5 years and a split on 20 ozs. I ended up here as a partner with 2 others. We helicoptered in but it was only 2 miles in by foot on the M.Yuba. It was a first find of virgin ground that lasted more than 10 days.



In small scale mining such as this high grade ground such as this is sought because at the yardages moved by small dredges reworking ground left by the old timers rarely will carry more than a one man show.

The ground was about 1 dwt per hour for the first 4 ft.The next 10 to 12 ft. had basically nothing in it and was quartz laden. The last layer sitting on bedrock was a dark brown layer with green boulders with white stripes so positioned that they acted like as if bedrock itself. The gold was in piles off the corners and nooks of these boulders that pans of 1/2 oz to 1 oz could of easily been had had we wanted to. Even so we only took around 30 ozs because it was so deep and much of the time was moving boulders with a 6 ton hand chain come along.You can see the boulders with the orange bottoms that we winched out.That hole inspires one but I never saw another one like it tell not long ago 20 years later.

  
jeff08xx
04:08:24 Tue
Oct 23 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Quote: hoppingforpay at 02:26:46 Sat Oct 13 2012

And the 11 ozs. About 1/2 oz per day. Average pan about 100 colors making a pile about the size of a paper match head.A fairly heavy fine gold, not the kind that licking your finger will pick them up.Very rare to find gold of this richness just sitting on the surface but I am sure there are more of them out there for an intrepid prospector.


I like the tree camping idea. I would have liked to have seen how you did that work.


  
hoppingforpay
01:31:13 Fri
Oct 26 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

I just have public internet when the library is open so I am not daily on the net...

To that question. I just cut some poles wired or nailed them up in the trees then just laid alders across.I watched a lot of Gilligan's Island so I was prepared!

Whats funny is the first night I slept up there I watched a bear cross the river and waddle into my camp.I growled at him loud and he took off in a bolt.

  
hoppingforpay
02:26:29 Fri
Oct 26 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Geo,

I think the most important thing is that the .01 to .025 is absolutely rock solid assessment. If this is so for 10 million yards OTE should be able to get about 1 pennyweight per day anywhere he digs on these tailings. He digs almost 5 yds per day .01+.01+.01+.01+.01= .05 a pennyweight. Rather than just agree and extrapolate into the "future mine" you should invite him to come up and test the ground to see if it truly is 10 million yds of .01 to .025

This would mean that the dragline operation was losing 1 pennyweight to 2 pennyweight per 5 yds it ran for an entire 10 million yds. What was the grade to begin with?

  
geowizard
02:41:03 Fri
Oct 26 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

hoppingforpay,

Those are good points and good ideas! Thanks!

The placer gold at Ophir was mined using dragline-sluice methods. The method was considerd to be 50 percent efficient. Considering that about 100,000 ounces were recovered, it would be reasonable to assume 100,000 ounces remain in the tailings. I have done extensive sampling and other - third party samplers have sampled the tailings. I also had a full scale lease that ran for a little over two years. His lease was not renewed and has now expired. The lessee recovered on average .01 opy consistently, mining over a thousand yards per day. I monitored most of the operation and derived the grade from the total yards and final pay.

Mining also was done on a high bench I refer to as the nugget patch. This was a 5 acre test of virgin ground near an area that was hydrauliked in the 1960's. The nuggets that I received can be viewed on www.stampede-gold.com .

- Geowizard

  
overtheedge
04:20:13 Fri
Oct 26 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine


Quote: hoppingforpay

If this is so for 10 million yards OTE should be able to get about 1 pennyweight per day anywhere he digs on these tailings. He digs almost 5 yds per day .01+.01+.01+.01+.01= .05 a pennyweight. Rather than just agree and extrapolate into the "future mine" you should invite him to come up and test the ground to see if it truly is 10 million yds of .01 to .025


Wow. It is roughly 400 miles from me to Ophir in a straight line. No road from here to there.

Like crossing 2 state borders. One by car and one by plane.

Invite? To determine if 10 million yards of 40-100 yard gravel are stockpiled? Using a shovel-in recovery system for 1 dwt/day ($55-60)?

Maybe drop by after church and knock her off real quick. Wanna stop for a pizza on the way home? Let me buy, I'm hammering down a 1 dwt/day.
eric

  
shaftsinkerawc
15:31:33 Fri
Oct 26 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

I'll put ya up overnight OTE, and cover breakfast and coffee on your way up.

  
geowizard
15:54:05 Fri
Oct 26 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Is this a non profit organization or what!!? :confused:

There is a barrier to entry. As in any business, there is an "entry fee". The saying; "It takes money to make money" is true in placer mining.

Money:

Money doesn't grow on trees... So, where does money grow?

To my surprise a few years ago, while looking for a money farm, I found out that there are businesses that invest "venture capital" in mining companies! In the last year, I have read that there are companies that have grown so much cash that they can't find enough banks to put it in. The problems are related to the limits of insurability on deposits. These companies; primarilly Canadian, actually get a tax break on money that is invested in mining. The money must be invested in a Canadian Mining company. That's WHY so many mining companies are listed on the TSX and located in Vancouver, BC. The companies are "public", not "private". My mine is "private"!

How to grow your own money:

Having been in the exploration business for "a long time", I had acquired some of the best "privately owned" mining properties in Arizona. I listed a property on www.goldandsilvermines.com . The phone began to ring. Eventually, a real live buyer came along and "Bingo",a check arrived on my doorstep (literally). The property that I sold is the largest, privately owned underground mine in Arizona.

Seed money:

Rule #1: When mining property generates revenue, the money must be used as seed money to grow more money. If the money is taken as "income", it becomes taxable and therefore shared. Therefore, the revenue earned, must immediately become revenue expended.

Acquisition:

People always ask me; "How do you know where to find Gold?"

My reply: "At a Gold mine!"

Realizing the plight of federal lands in the CONUS, I began my search for Gold Mines in Alaska.

There's no place like NOME! Nome still holds all of the production records. It was once considered as being the largest gold producing region in the world!

The problem with Nome is access. Problems with access affect time on the ground and cost of everything that you touch. The other problem is weather. The season is short. If mother nature does not behave, the mining season can be shortened and/or become non-existent.

I began search for ground to plant seed money in the interior. Being an Alaskan, having lived in Alaska, I knew about conditions in the interior. I staked a placer gold mining property near Ophir and the next year, Ophir was abandoned. I did the same at Ophir. I sold a very nice Silver mine in Arizona. The next year additional seed money was spent on acquisition of 23 more claims, increasing the total to 32 claims.

Money doesn't grow on trees... Knowing how to make money grow is part of the key to getting through the financial barrier to entry.

I don't have money. When I put a dollar in my wallet, and take it out the next day, It buys less than it did the day before. Plant money and watch it grow!

Last year, I sold a 50 percent interest in mining assets in Alaska. I organized Alaska Gold Exploration, LLC and staked over 20,000 acres of exploration targets. Visit www.alaska-gold.com .

- Geowizard

[3 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 16:15:03 Fri Oct 26 2012]

  
hoppingforpay
23:19:02 Sat
Oct 27 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

I have dredged with an 8" years ago where a bucket dredge had been because it panned good along the shore.These tailings were brought back down by the river so there was some concentrating action to help out the grade.It ended up not quite good enough at 1/2 oz per day.At the time I was only getting around $240 for an oz. so I left after a week.Seasons on rivers very drastically on permissable days of work just as in Nome.To stay out of debt for most guys that want to try the gold thing a winter job is needed.Ski resort? teacher? bus driver?

Otherwise whomever is dependant upon you will most likely become upset at your endeaver.

Ote,
I went to the Koyukuk for 6 dwt. towing boat and dredge.400 miles aint nothing in Ak.

  
hoppingforpay
23:46:27 Sat
Oct 27 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Heading down Koyokuk.In fact the second time.Went with a pan first trip. There are probably some skim bars down by Bettles or Hughes or who knows where else.


  
baub
23:53:34 Sat
Oct 27 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Good thread.

  
geowizard
00:20:40 Sun
Oct 28 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine


Logistics:

Logistics can be painful. If it isn't the first request, it's the second request made by every wannabe placer miner. I wann-a-be-able to drive my RV and pull my dredge on a trailer behind it to a paved dredge launch.

We all have our creature comforts!

Me, I like the "dry" heat of the Southwest. Over the last Billion years, continental drift has moved Alaska 3000 miles north of the Sonoran Desert.:confused:

In 2011, I made five round trips to the land of the Great Nanook. In 2012, I made three trips! BTW, it's 3000 miles from Beijing China too. I could live in Beijing and have the same commute! In order to remain pacified, I always fly first class. So, at least once a year, if not more, I pamper myself. It isn't all about self-indulgence. There's no charge for baggage. They buy the food and refreshments! It's almost as cost effective considering the savings. In less than 24 hours including over-night in Anchorage, I'm boots on the ground at the mine.

- Geowizard

  
overtheedge
07:05:11 Sun
Oct 28 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine


Quote: geowizard

Logistics can be painful.


So you wanna placer mine?
You accomplish nothing without logistics. It doesn't matter how good you think the ground is or your eagerness. Logistics gets you and your support to the site and back.

It takes money to start, money to play and money just to get what little you've recovered to the refiner.

But what if money is tight?
What do you do?
Should you give up?

Each has to figure it out for yourself. It is possible to make a subsistence living placer mining. Some make middle class. Getting rich is just a fantasy. On occasion, fantasies come true. 9 out of 10 times, it is to someone who paid for the knowledge the hard way for many years. The other 1 out of 10? Some folks have fallen in the septic tank and gone on to date the prom queen.
eric

  
geowizard
15:07:16 Sun
Oct 28 2012

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Good question; "Should you give up?":confused:

Famous quotes:

"Winners don't quit and quitters don't win!"

"When is it over?, over..." It's "over" when I say; "It's over!"

Read about the Comstock Lode! The previous mining company "QUIT" 3 feet from the Mother Lode!

What separates winners from losers in placer mining?:confused:

The losers "QUIT".

By definition, "quitters" are "losers"!

What is an "entrepreneur"? Entrepeneurs are "business people". In business, "You have to be willing to accept losses as well as gains"!

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
15:36:31 Sun
Oct 28 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

But Geowizard, "What if Money is tight!"

:welcome:

Yes, "Money is tight!" One of the things that we have plenty of is "PROBLEMS". Ever see anybody with a "problem"? How many people do YOU know that have "problems"?

Problems represent "OPPORTUNITY.

New Book: "How to make Money in Mining", By Geowizard


Chapter 1:

Mining the Miners: :smile:

Search all of the gold forums for "problems".

Did early miners have any problems?

Si! Who provided solutions?

I personally know of companies that consult on the subject of mining logistics. There are companies that provide support services for mining companies.

There are companies that teach MSHA classes and provide consulting services on mine safety!

The mining support "services" sector is a multi-billion dollar industry!

"Services" require little or NO investment! Mining corporations (with proper negotiation) PAY for the cost of setting up service providers IF there is a cost for initial setup.

Opportunities are everywhere. The bigger the problem, the more "costly" the solution.

- Geowizard

[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 15:45:01 Sun Oct 28 2012]

  
overtheedge
18:05:45 Sun
Oct 28 2012

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Problems. We all have problems.

When I was a Combat Engineer 12B3, we had a saying, "There is no problem that can't be solved by the suitable use of high explosives." The underlying principle is that a solution exists.

I learned this problem solving format at the NCO Academy.

1. Identify the problem
Make sure you have correctly identified the problem. Symptoms are not the problem. Sometimes the most apparent problem isn't the fundamental problem.

2. Identify all the possible solutions.
All the solutions no matter how silly or impractical.

3. Select the best solution.
Okay, here is where you weed out those silly and impractical solutions. What you are looking for is efficiency and timeliness. Efficiency usually is based upon costs. Timeliness has to be a consideration. Some get worse the longer you delay, others pile up.

4. Implement the solution.
If you did the above process, the probability is "no more problem".

5. Follow-up on the solution.
Make sure that you chose the best solution. Don't fall in love with the solution, change if its not working. You still have that list to chose from.

The surest way to fail is by not starting.
2nd easiest, lack of good intel.
3rd failing to deal with logistics.

eric

  
geowizard
15:36:23 Mon
Oct 29 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

hoppingforpay,

Nice photo!

Yes, I agree. Logistics in Alaska represents a special case. I found early-on living in Alaska, that the road system had it's limits. I once drove to the end of the road (Wasilla). Wasilla was at the end of a dirt road and was only a few scattered log homes in the woods! :smile:

Flying wasn't a matter of choice. It was a matter of necessity! Being ground-bound in Alaska can be clostraphobic. Everywhere you go, you're outnumbered and surrounded by trees. Flying is expensive. It's getting more expensive for everyone including pilots.

Boating and using the water-ways seems like a practical alternative. Logistics being limited by the modes of transportation and water transport being an option, boating solves some of the problems of logistics.

- Geowizard

  
hoppingforpay
03:12:39 Tue
Oct 30 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

I am still not quite convinced that there are 120 million dollars in them tailings according to your sampling explanation. It's a major deal to prove 10 million yds. I read the grade changes and there were many operators with no doubt different losses. I read there is one claim in 1933 reported 7 to 8 bucks a square ft. Thats insanely rich. Do you know where that is?

I think in order to attract what your looking for is to prove out 5 to 10,000 ozs. I do not know what the last operator did as far as prospecting is concerned. Dragline tailings would be different than bucket dredge tailings. They may just discard the top gravel. I don't know if the last operator got to bedrock or not.A dragline would be a poor performer on resistant bedrock hitting bedrock could raise the value of the tailings. Because of lack of reach a small excavator may not have the same results.

Historical data is rough...ground changes do to the dudes who mined it.When I am dredging I see just what the old timer is doing or an excavator for that matter. Some are sloppy some aint. Sloppy is good! Like how did this nugget get on top of a peice of timber placed into the bedrock.

If I were to evaluate these tailings the inexpensive way I would take thousands of pans. My gut feeling is that many pans will be empty because the ground is supposedly coarse 5 grns per yd coarse could be 1 to 20 peices.Heck you might take 100 pans all empty 30 ft apart and bam a 5 grn pan.Thats my mental picture right now and I'm standing by it till further info arrives. Overall tailings depress me they represent negative visual and caution alert. Intruder! Intruder!

  
geowizard
15:00:37 Tue
Oct 30 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

hoppingforpay,

You have obviously done your reading and had alot of experience at the process of sampling and mining.

My position has been neutral. I'm not buying and I'm not selling. The record stands for itself. When I look at a mine that has had past production, I look at two things.

1. Scale:

The scale of placer mining is obvious from the tailings that remain. If a 2000 cubic yard tailing pile remains, it's because someone found gold. The larger the tailing pile, the more gold that was found. Short tailing piles represent an area that was marginal to subeconomic.

2. Continuity:

Was the placer deposit continuous or intermittent? In this case, the placer mining was continuous. The creek bed is a wide area averaging 1000 feet across.

Your reference to the precision of mining is a very good point. In the case at hand, at Ophir, there were limits on the degree of precision that could be applied from a mine engineering standpoint. The perfect scenario would be to dig a hole and place the tailings on virgin ground. Then dig a second hole and place the tailings in the first hole. The dragline has to be positioned on a bench. For mining to be continuous, the dragline has to be continuously repositioned on the bench. In the real world, positioning is never optimal. The dragline has to be able to reach the digging, reach the sluice and reach the tailing pile. On a typical day, 12 men shoveled material through the sluice box. Dragline buckets had holes in the sides for water to escape. Nuggets escaped through the holes.

The only reason mining stopped was because they had to. The reason was because the sluice box was completely full of gold.

The sluice box or boxes were set on the ground. The creek was diverted at a point uphill into a channel. The channel provides water from a higher level, almost 100 feet above creek level. The channel could be opened at points above the sluice so that the entire creek flowed through the sluice box. No pumping was required.

All of the production and all of the sampling that has been done has been consistent. The average tenor of the tailings is .025 opy. I use the value of .01 opy to remain conservative.

Virgin Ground:

The lessee opened a 5 acre cut on a bench. The cut was mined down to bedrock (shale). He cut into the shale about 12-18 inches to recover the gold in the upper bedrock. I refer to the cut as the nugget patch because of the nugget gold that was recovered. I held 100 ounces from one cleanup in my hands after it was weighed - mostly 8 mesh to 20 mesh gold.

The obvious problem with virgin ground is the strip ratio. A second issue is permafrost.

The Good News:

The cut was made because it was the site of extensive past hydrauliking and drift mining. It possibly represents the richest placer deposit on the mine. The last week of operation this year, I had a group of Chinese - representatives of a Chinese Exploration Company visit the mine. They were interested in finding the lode. One day while they were out walking the tundra, I decided to look over the fresh cut, broken shale bedrock in the nugget patch. I could see visible metal in the shale. I pocketed a few samples for later evaluation. The next morning, the group was discouraged having not found any "exposures".:confused:

I took one of the samples of solid shale,went to the kitchen picked up a new cast iron skillet and went outside. I took a sledge hammer to use for a pestle and milled the shale down to 200 to 300 mesh. Put the pulverized sample in a pan and by now the group was leaning over my shoulder. I panned the sample and in a few minutes - Gold!

- Geowizard

  
hoppingforpay
01:19:48 Fri
Nov 2 2012

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Geo, All your ground sounds pretty promissing.Funny it comes out to about a 10 cent pan averaged out.The new pan same as the old pan just a little less yellow.I am staying a dredger and have my own ground to finish so it's someone elses show.And no not Tony and Squeeky they still need to fail more!

  
hoppingforpay
01:53:55 Fri
Nov 2 2012

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When I arrived at the middle fork Yuba in 1985 I was 23 and had been to the Yukon by myself and the Clearwater River with 2 of my highschool friends and our new 5" triple sluice. Within a few days of road camping I met the residents of the area. There was Vaughn and Debbie Groleau, Carl and Debbie Sherman and Kanaka Bill. Later there was Cliff Leach,Mark Fussel,Murphy,Crazy Joe,Emil,George,my dad and eventually Pennyweight Perkins. All of them were either bedrock scratchers or dredgers. Most of them had beards, were dirty and had very little money but would show anyone their small vials of gold. Vaughn and Debbie were staying in a bus with a van welded to the top of the bus for sleeping.
Fussel would talk about his father who had been dredging on the Delhi before all of us showed up. He pointed out a spot just above the Delhi where he said his dad had pulled 1000 ounces. I personnally didnt believe him at the time but later on Vaughn,Fussel and others found quite a bit of coarse gold there for at least 4 yrs.
I decided to take my dredge upstream where I found another resident laying on a gravel bar dead 1/4 mile upstream. I ran out and told Carl whom I had known for 2 or 3 days that there was a dead man upstream.Carl said maybe its old man Schmidty then reached into the bushes and retrieved a pistol. I was nervous about the gun so I kept well ahead of Carl when leading him to the body. It was Schmidty bloated and practically see through. Vaughn ,myself and 2 policeman carried out the body on a very steep narrow trail. Schmidty had been staying 2 miles upstream in a shack on a claim that Cliff, Kanaka Bill and I were to later dredge. He had apparently fell off the trail into the river somewhere. I never found out.
In time, all of us except for a few were able to work a deal to work the locally infamous Delhi.I walked to work past Vaughns bus almost every day with 5 gallons on my back to my dredge 1 to 2 miles down river. Many times I would stop by at Vaughn and Debbies for a couple beers after work. One time I left to go to my camp 4 switchbacks up the gravel road. When I arrived at Murphys cabover camper he had loaned me there was something making a trumpeting sound over and over like an elephant while running up a hill that I could not climb on all fours. My dog Bert was barking like crazy and I was thinking Bigfoot! I went back down to the bridge and told everyone I think I just heard Bigfoot up at my camp! I imitated the noise and told of hearing its feet in the oak leaves as it ran uphill. To this day I don't know what it was, I have never heard that elephant trumpetting noise again.
The next weird thing that happened that stands out above the many other weird events that accompany this neck of the woods was a trip home from a night at Doc Willy's. Kanaka Bill ,Vaughn,Debbie and myself in my 66 Chevy pickup see a truck parked dead center on the highway that leads to Graniteville. We stop and all get out and inspect it. There are no tires on both front wheels and the rims appear to be melted up to the hubs. The rims were the shape of a D. Flat side on the pavement.We inspected the road behind it to see if it was dragged but there were no scratches in the asphalt. It was Kanaka Bill who said let's get the F out of here. We did.
I played left field for the Twin Sisters Muckers we lost every softball game we entered. Dick at 2nd base with a beer on the ground and a cigarrette in his ungloved hand was not the reason nor Patty his wife and quite offensive cheerleader. Swede who created the Muckers softball team had reopened the Twin Sisters mine, quite an accomlishment for a family outfit to get an underground mine going again.There were constant problems with the mine itself, legal issues and weird neighbors. Randolf Hearst had owned this mine at one time.
Of all these characters who got into mining I think I am the only one still going. Vaughn and Debbie died in separate vehicle accidents. Carl died a year or so after a rattlesnake bit him. Debbie is still in a trailer close to the Delhi. Kanaka Bill lost some fingers setting chokers then became a jeweler. Mark Fussel died in the 16 to 1 mine.Cliff Leach who helped finance mining projects including the 2 helicopter projects I described died on the Fortymile when his 4 wheeler tipped over. Dick froze to death trying to make it home when his sno-go quit.Murphy who told tales of a perpetual motion machine he made and took to the White House and of his days as a take on all comers boxer and geothermal contractor died of old age. Emil one of the Czechs along with George are whereabouts unknown but the son of Emil might be in Nome looking to winter dredge.My dad hangs around Whitebird helping old guys find gold on the Salmon without much luck. Pennyweight Perkins and Crazy Joe...are thinking and talking gold and ready to fight if you call em Pennyweight Perkins or Crazy Joe. Neither one has a pennyweight.
South Forkers Doug ,Fran and Ross H. dredged till the closing by the Terminator and deserve honorable mention as part of my family in the beginning.


  
hoppingforpay
02:19:40 Fri
Nov 2 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Winter dredging Delhi 1988 had a 2 oz day near this spot.Fussel's dad had a huge and I mean Huge Hopto Excavator in besides the dragline of earlier years.Bars are on punchplate do to finding nugs in riffles after punchplate. One bar is worn off.Mitts are 3/8 inch thick.Welcome matt damper.First semi-self built dredge.


  
hoppingforpay
04:18:02 Fri
Nov 2 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

I was a little off about Vaughn.He was a good dredger.Nice guy.




Print


Vaughn M. Groleau


Braintree—Vaughn M. Groleau, 55, died unexpectedly, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010 at his home.

He was born March 10, 1955 in Randolph; the son of Lawrence and Altha (Duclos) Groleau. He served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, and came to Braintree from California in 1997. He enjoyed gold mining while in California, making stained glass, his dog “Johnny,” his family, and playing guitar and harmonica at family get-togethers.

Survivors include his father, Lawrence Groleau of Columbia, S.C.; daughter, Janet Bacher of Florida; brothers, Ron Groleau of Webster, Mass., Alan Groleau of Hopkins, S.C., and Daryl Groleau of Dayville, Conn.; sister, Diane Lake of Braintree, and grandchildren.



Ote, You would of liked Cliff Leach career military guy. I remember him most in his white saggy choners winching rocks on the Middle Fork! Looked like Baby Huey!

  
geowizard
20:58:29 Fri
Nov 2 2012

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hoppingforpay,

You are a true windtalker. Hopefully, someday, others will mention that we once lived here.

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
00:58:50 Sat
Nov 3 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

One of the constants of placer mining is time. Time is not a variable!

I added three clocks to my cabin. One in my bedroom, one in the crew bedroom, and one in the dining area. The clocks are reminders that with each tick we come one tick closer to the end of the season.

I hear people exclaim that they are happy to get out in the bush where they don't have to worry about what time it is. :confused:

The clock is ticking.

In winter months, where I live in Arizona, time seems to stand still. Nothing moves... Except the sun.

My front door and two windows face to the east. The door window has a design on it. As the sun rises each day, the design appears on the opposite wall of the room near the big screen flat panel TV. Each day, as the sun rises farther to the south, the image appears at progressively different points on the wall. Early inhabitants of Mexico and the desert southwest noticed the sun changed with the seasons and would mark the position of a point of light on the wall or a table as each day went by and year after year, the seasons came and they went. Seasons coming and going are predictable. The time passes and ultimately, our time will pass.

Placer mining has a time element.:confused:

Time management:

Either you manage time or you don't.

If you manage production, you manage time.

If you manage fuel, you manage time.

If you placer mine, you manage time.

We can save time! We can to a certain degree borrow time. We have no choice in spending time.

Time can be used to add value. If we educate others that are in a position to improve our productivity or their own productivity, there is a return on the time we expended.

Spending time thinking of an efficient way to perform a task that saves time can actually work to put time in a savings account. If time is saved and that saved time is used in a manner that saves additional time, it's possible to get things done ahead of time!

- Geowizard
[2 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 01:11:18 Sat Nov 3 2012]

  
hoppingforpay
01:12:42 Sun
Nov 4 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

I am curious if any of the people I mentioned will find out they are now immortalized on the internet. I would be surprized if they do, internet has not made it to them yet.I cruise by some years and see Doug and Fran to get the news if any. The rivers are empty now the trails no longer exist. Kanaka's cabin on a patented claim was given to the Sierra Club. Dredge parts sit under layers of oak leaves.All some of them have are TV shows to rant about.And that one hole they can't get at anymore.

I imagine guys show up on a summer weekend to take a pan or scratch a bedrock crack that was scratched out long ago.They have no idea what went on before them.Long gone.

  
hoppingforpay
01:18:25 Sun
Nov 4 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

Virgin gravel hanging on a face. A scratcher has got to it. The good stuff is gone. Might be a nug in there but you are going to earn it. Delhi


  
hoppingforpay
01:28:11 Sun
Nov 4 2012

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Re: So you wanna placer mine

The 16 to 1

Marks story is in it.

http://www.origsix.com/

  

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