Lost Password :: Posting Pictures :: Who's Online :: Stats :: Memberlist :: Top Posters :: Search
:: :: The Jewellers shop
Unsubscribe From Newsletter



Welcome, Register :: Log In Welcome to our newest member, Agent67.
Users active in this forum:
Users active in this thread: Guest

1 people online in the last 1 minutes - 0 members, 0 anon and 1 guests. (Most ever was 29 at 13:36:32 Sat Aug 3 2002)

Pages: [ 1 ]

[ Notify of replies made to this post ][ Print ][ Send To Friend ] [ Watch ] [ < ] [ Add Reply ] [ > ]

hoppingforpay
18:16:05 Tue
Feb 25 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
The Jewellers shop

This is one of the best stories out there in gold forum land. I don't know if it was posted here ever but even if it was I am sure many readers have not seen it. This is an uncommonly rich streak that a handful of dredgers in Alaska can claim to have worked but don't write about on the net for fear of unwanted company.

This website is more about dredging as a livelihood, and because of this, there are not many long threads but many no nonsense short threads with useful info.

For the most part roadside gold like this in Alaska is a thing of the past. But for a knowledgeable and capable dredger, the deep interior of Alaska could contain a few of these.

The page views are clicked at the top.

http://golddredgingforum.proboards.com/thread/180/jewellers-shop

  
macheteman
15:51:06 Thu
Feb 27 2014

Offline
0 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

I'm not sure why the reference to Alaska, as these posts refer to New Zealand. Regards..

  
hoppingforpay
19:11:21 Thu
Feb 27 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Yeah, I could of written it better...

I just meant to imply that rich streaks like this one in NZ would be a rare deal off the highway in Alaska. Not to many roads in Ak parallel gold streams that haven't been prospected or mined pretty well of the high grade.

One would need to use very high selectivity to look for a deposit like this and would most likely be on a historically well known creek or river and on someone else's claim.

Rich patches do exist off Nome but just a small percentage of leases off shore contain such ground. Getting on a lease with real decent ground and getting good weather along with being a capable dredger would be what you're up against. That and a lot of waiting...

  
geowizard
22:24:42 Thu
Feb 27 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Yes it was an excellent example.



I mentioned in the past the "otter" I met on upper Crow Creek (circa 1973). A human otter swimming in the frigid water and his suction dredge mounted on an inner tube. We met briefly. I drove on up to the end of the road and returned to my daily routine and working as a bus boy at the Royal Inn in Anchorage. The Hotel desk at the Royal Inn had a large entry-way that was often used by vendors to set up jewelry displays, etc.

One day, as I was leaving the restaurant through the entry-way, there was an amazing display of GOLD nugget jewelry! Nugget watch bands like you have rarely ever seen! All dressed up for the show was the "otter".

He explained that he spent his winters living in the Penthouse Suite at the Royal Inn and sold his nugget jewelry.

I always wanted to be like him!

- Geowizard

Edit - it was "his" nugget jewelry!
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 22:27:36 Thu Feb 27 2014]

  
hoppingforpay
18:45:56 Fri
Feb 28 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

I'm a Motel 6 kinda guy ( I gotta dog, and well, they keep the light on for me). This is recent and an upgrade from gravel pits. For those who don't know Motel 6 has upgraded their rooms, no more Partridge Family bus colored bed covers and all new Europe-y décor. Not all of them yet but they are working on it.

I wonder if the NZ guy checked out the gravel side of the river? Perhaps a bucket dredge went through or someone else dredged it up. She's a lake now.

Pretty tough regs over there. Almost all the land is blanketed by big company mineral leases. I do like that the small guys can get long stretches of creek or river reserved for themselves, but wow, what a process. A claim would be a pretty risky buy for someone whom doesn't know the recent past history of a section for sale. Spendy over there too.


  
geowizard
01:34:25 Sat
Mar 1 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


Crow Creek (Alaska) has a road right up to where the nuggets came from. :confused:

As glaciers recede, new ground is exposed. Many areas around the Alaska Range are being exposed. The problem is access. But, there are plenty of places with access and gold.

The mention of nugget jewelry should stir a wee-bit of interest in the value-added aspect of gold mining and turning your own gold into a piece of jewelry!

- Geowizard

  
azkid
17:30:46 Sat
Mar 1 2014

Offline
503 posts

Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

and if they ever build the road to Nome its going to open up a ton of ne prospecting places like that

  
hoppingforpay
22:07:13 Sun
Mar 2 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Yes Geo,

In 1973 there was easier gold to be found close to the road. I am not saying their are not any big streaks to be found close to the road just that they have been diminished big time by dredges and dozers with only just a few knowing anything about it.

The low hanging fruit is gone so searching for gold finds, of size, is a better bet in places hard to get to. Although going some place that hasn't any gold production history is a big risk also if ventured into.

There are miners taking serious amounts of gold off many drive to places with heavy equipment but it is another story if we are talking of dredging 600 oz. paystreaks pulled in a few months off a road.

I too could hang out in a fancy hotel and sell nuggets to pay my way, but I consider that a wasteful way to use my gold.

  
geowizard
03:42:00 Mon
Mar 3 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


You can sell your gold for less than spot or use a little imagination and convert it into something that someone can wear.

The process of adding value to gold by forming it into a beautiful piece of jewelry is not trivial but it is possible to do things that represent simple gold-smith tasks to make a sellable product. Jewelry has a multiplicative added value that can be ten times the actual gold value.

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
03:51:00 Mon
Mar 3 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


Roads and gold are counter-intuitive.

I get requests all the time for mining claims with a good road, preferably a paved road! Well, if the road was made so miners could get to the gold and now the road is still there and the miners are gone... They probably have already extracted ALL of the gold.

So, intuition should be clear that the remaining gold has NO ROAD. I spend every single day locating new areas of high grade mineralization. There's NO ROAD. IT hasn't been discovered before! There was never a reason to build a road! Roads need to have a reason before they get built! :confused:

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
15:54:27 Mon
Mar 3 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

With reference to azkid's post about the road to Nome;

The people of the State of Alaska know the importance of development of their natural resources. History has shown the impact of road building in the ALCAN highway and the road to the North Slope.

The Western Corridor Access Road to Nome has come under fire from opposition that stands to benefit the most - that is interior Alaskans.

- Geowizard

  
shaftsinkerawc
18:06:26 Mon
Mar 3 2014

Offline
60 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Not sure what you mean Geo, not all Interior Alaska voters are against the Road. My view is just the newcomers that don't realize the houses they live in and the cars they drive and other things in daily life use natural resources that must be mined, logged, farmed and drilled. Have a great day.

  
geowizard
21:20:18 Mon
Mar 3 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


Here's a link to details on the project:

http://www.westernalaskacopperandgold.com/news/January%202010%20ADOT%20Corridor%20Planning%20Report%20Executive%20Summary.pdf

There are a number of conflicting interests among native groups. Much of the commentary is found in other related documents.

It would be a big win for mining and other forms of natural resource development.

- Geowizard


  
hoppingforpay
17:57:51 Tue
Mar 4 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Geo,

Nothing wrong with added value. But I would stay at Motel 6 and sell at the Hyatt Hotel to not lose that added value.

Highgrade mineralization doesn't equal highgrade PM's. It doesn't take long to become deep in the hole trying to claim and prove these prospects via helicopter.

I was going to point this out to Bababooey but the thread got deleted before I got back. That and the thought that he could drive around willy-nilly on a 4 wheeler with some sort of drill attachment on the back in that country. It wouldn't be fun at all...




  
dickb
21:43:58 Tue
Mar 4 2014

Offline
102 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Well after reading this study, that idea makes good sense, We can expect that it will never be built. Just like Pebble change comes hard.

Dickb :confused:


  
geowizard
22:43:05 Tue
Mar 4 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Hoppingforpay,

I agree on some points and disagree on others.

Motel 6 is too expensive!

Security is a big issue when you sell gold jewelry. Top floor requires security key to take the elevator. Stairs are locked access.

More to come...

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
15:02:44 Wed
Mar 5 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


So, to the statement that; "high grade mineralization doesn't equal high grade PM's". Exploration for gold or other precious metals involves discovery. The process of discovery involves looking where others have not looked.

So, an example might be looking for a lode in an area that already has been mined for placer and has shown extensive gold production. Looking for and eventually discovering high grade mineralization becomes the objective. High grade mineralization in, on, or around a proven gold producing district has the highest potential for being the source of the local distribution of gold. The mineralization usually contains other accessory minerals and metals besides gold or silver.

The other argument would be that you don't look for a local deposit because it probably would not be related to the local production of gold. :confused:

Alaska represents the best example I know of where hundreds, and more on the order of thousands of placer gold deposits occur and the sources of that gold remain undiscovered. There are papers published on the subject that show detailed statistics on production by mining district and the number of ounces produced from lode and placer.

So, ultimately, exploration for precious metals and-or any metals takes us to methods that allow us to see what he cannot see. Most of the interior of Alaska is covered. You cannot simply walk out into the bush and begin hammering away at an outcrop. The exploration for new deposits will require new thinking. It will require methods that have not been used before. I my opinion, there have been missed opportunities because certain types of deposits have been excluded from exploration. When conventional thinking isn't working, the rational alternative would be to evaluate the process of thinking that isn't working.

- Geowizard

  
hoppingforpay
18:26:05 Wed
Mar 5 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Yes Geo,

I see that since 2008 you have been staking hundreds of claims deep into the interior of Alaska every summer, fall and winter but mostly in the winter. Sometimes up to 60 claims per day. Do use a helicopter or a snowmachine to accomplish this? How did your claim staking expedition work out this past Dec. and January or February go?

Dickb,

In the area that baba was going he would be getting stuck every 30 ft or so on a 4 wheeler he couldn't have done what he "planned" right after nixing his Charlie River Park plan....











  
geowizard
23:16:28 Wed
Mar 5 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

hoppingforpay,

During the off-season, locating and staking claims becomes an integral part of the business. Staking can be done in a number of ways. The typical harpoon stake is a 4x4 cut 8 inches long with a section of rebar to stick in the ground. The wood post section is painted with high visibility fluorescent red paint, claim sticker applied and a copy of the claim notice placed in a film canister that is capped and inserted in a cavity in the top of the stake.

In small groups, claims can be staked preferably in winter by snow machines. Large groups can be staked using a Cessna 180 or a Hughes 500 helicopter. At 60 miles per hour, stakes can be placed at half mile corners every 30 seconds. Flight planning is essential. The grid can be laid out on GPS. Cutting the staking time, reduces the cost involved.

Sampling can be done with GPS control points and drill holes planned according to a priority system based on the significance of the geophysical data.

This summer, 2014, will be interesting because additional funding will enable increasing exploration. Many exploration companies are sizing down, that opens windows of opportunity for my company.

- Geowizard

[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 23:18:33 Wed Mar 5 2014]

  
hoppingforpay
17:47:08 Thu
Mar 6 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


; )


Phil, nice find on the Clutha!

  
dickb
17:25:43 Fri
Mar 7 2014

Offline
102 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Hop:

I was referring to the road to Nome study.

Dickb

  
hoppingforpay
02:59:46 Sat
Mar 8 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

dickb,

Sometimes I catch the meaning sometimes I miss. I am sure the same thing happens with the interpretations of my writing... You know the bushy factor+ heredity+too many internet searches makes for a complicated mix in the head. Maybe I'll sort it out one day, but I doubt it.

.Pretty soon I will be completely misunderstood by all. In real life very few words come out of me. It's for my own good!

  
hoppingforpay
18:17:57 Tue
Apr 1 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop



A Hughes 500 working or me. The pilot is a cool guy.

  
hoppingforpay
19:02:48 Tue
Apr 1 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop



This is a staking expedition camp on Liberty Creek. The tent is on spruce boughs. The time of year is April. The upstream miner used a dragline, and is a funky character. I don't think he did that well.

You really need to know your stuff to get here in mid-winter since the road is closed at Tetlin Jct. and it is usually much colder.

Most likely not dredging ground do to depth of ground, width of valley and history of being lean. Definitely not a Jewellers shop.

  
geowizard
21:35:09 Tue
Apr 1 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


In 1998, a geophysical survey was conducted on portions of the Forty-Mile by helicopter.

There were 9,033 reported geophysical anomalies.

Nine of the anomalies are grade 7, world class anomalies.

One of those was on a tributary of Liberty Creek.

The anomaly is not claimed to this date.

I know of four world class anomalies that are in the same section. They also remain unclaimed.

To date, I have spent almost 2000 hours mapping discrete bedrock anomalies in the Forty-Mile district. There are 7,854 discrete bedrock anomalies. 1,025 surface anomalies,

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
14:53:01 Wed
Apr 2 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


So, if you're looking for a jewelry shop in the Forty-Mile, there are 9 world class locations. For reference purposes, I give these anomalies a "score".

Grade 7 has a score greater than 100.

There is an anomaly with a score of 107.9 located 1.6 miles from the south end of the runway at Chicken. :confused:

Another anomaly with a score of 80.8 located 2.1 miles from the south end of the runway right next to the Taylor highway.

Another anomaly with a score of 102.0 located 2.7 miles from the south end of the runway.

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
15:06:55 Wed
Apr 2 2014

Offline
posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


Not every anomaly is a world class anomaly.

Grade 6 anomalies have scores from 50 to 100. There are 11 grade 6 anomalies in the Forty-Mile.

Grade 5 anomalies have scores from 20 to 50. There are 63 grade five anomalies in the Forty-Mile.

There are lode deposits that are supported by geophysical data connected with most of the placer deposits - both known and yet undiscovered placer deposits.

There is a grade 5 anomaly on Stonehouse 4 that has a score of 23.3.

- Geowizard



  
hoppingforpay
17:47:11 Thu
Apr 3 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop

Why don't you fire up your Elan then and stake them. I am not interested in that kind of speculative staking.

  
hoppingforpay
16:42:15 Sat
Apr 5 2014

Offline
164 posts
Reply
Re: The Jewellers shop


Geo,

At least you read reports and what not, that is better than many prospective prospectors.....

  

Pages: [ 1 ]

[ Notify of replies made to this post ][ Print ][ Send To Friend ] [ Watch ] [ < ] [ Add Reply ] [ > ]

 Total Members: 11956

  • Can start a new thread. (Everyone)
  • Can't start a new poll. (Mods & Admins)
  • Can add a reply. (Everyone)
  • Can't edit your posts.(Everyone Registered)
  • Register :: Log In :: Administrators

    The time is now 07:55:18 Thu Dec 9 2021

    Powered By BbBoard V1.4.2
    © 2001-2007 BbBoy.net
    :: :: The Jewellers shop

    [Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

    [Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]