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Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) ( 16:37:47 ThuOct 29 2015 )

Beach Gold Placers of West Coast North America (excluding Nome, AK) [Part 1 of 4]

(Reposted from my Alaska Gold Prospecting Forum post of 09-May-2009)

29-Oct-2015 Note: Owing to my having recently sold my goldfever.com domain where many of the images for this article were posted I decided to relocate those images and repost.


Introduction:

The gold beach placers of Nome, Alaska, may seem like the 800 pound gorilla of beach placers, and rightly so, but there are hundreds of other beaches that have produced historically significant amounts of beach placer gold all up and down the West coast of the USA and Canada.

Historical accounts suggest that Russian sea otter fur traders and explorers were among the first new comers to the West Coast of North America to discover beach placer gold and commence mining operations the summer of 1777 on Guyot Beach (Icy Bay). However, most West Coast beach mining records and accounts begin in earnest in the early 1850s.

I have compiled historical data and accounts from published USGS, Bureau of Mines, and others, and then placing tacking pins with that information into a Google Earth kmz file that can be shared between Google Earth users. I recommend that you download and install Google Earth, assuming you haven't already, if you would like to take full advantage of the information presented with this research.

http://www.google.com/earth/download/ge/agree.html

At the present time I have approximately 88 separate beaches indexed with at least 50 more that I have investigated and may eventually get around to including those additional data in the future. However, in dealing with historical documentation specific coordinates of locations cannot be assumed precise or accurate. If you notice any mistakes or inaccuracies within these data or can suggest ways to increase the accuracy of these data I would appreciate your letting me know.

Beach gold placer mining played an important historical role in the exploration and early settlement of the West coast of the USA, Canada, and Alaska, and I am not aware that a thorough examination of this history has been attempted previously. I have specifically omitted the gold placer beaches Nome, Alaksa, owing to there having been far more books written and documentation available for this beach than any other, and including the fact that not productive and profitable beach gold mining occured on the beaches of Nome, Alaska.

I am going to start North and work my way South.

Seward Peninsula, Alaska



1. Alder Creek Beach Placers, Alaska
66 3'21.31"N,16212'6.87"W
Alder Creek Beach Placers, Alaska: Located on Kotzebue Sound, the Alder Creek beach placer gold deposit consists of about one foot of beach gravel on eroded, dark gray, schist bedrock of early Paleozoic age. Fine, bright gold and some wire gold was found on the bedrock surface. Beach diggings of limited extent were reported to produce $8 to $10 (about 1 Oz Troy per day) per man in 1901 (Moffit, 1905). Production from 1902 to 1903 is believed to be about 580 ounces. Reported yield was 0.387 to 0.483 ozt gold per man per day.

2. Grantley Harbor Gold Beach Placers
6516'29.99"N,16613'50.88"W
District: Port Clarence
Coordinates: 6516'32"N,16613'41"W
Gold can be panned from beaches where white quartz boulders are common.

3. Daniels Creek Gold Beach Placers
6434'15.67"N,16345'31.79"W
District: Council
Coordinates: 6434'21"N,16345'20"W
This beach was one of the richest gold placer beaches ever found. The beach placer extended 500 feet west and 50 feet east of the mouth of Daniels Creek with 3 to 4 feet of gravel on clay and beneath about a foot of barren sand. The pay streak is locally cemented by manganese oxide. Gravel mainly schist mixed with some finer pieces of limestone. Production in 1900 was about 9,675 ozt gold from creek and about 29,000 ozt from beach. Total ozt gold production prior to WWII was probably about 90,000 ozt gold.

Goodnews Bay, Alaska:



1. Goodnews Bay Interior Platinum Placers
59 7'1.89"N,16146'57.59"W
Goodnews Bay Interior Platinum beach Placers were mined intermintantly between 1901 and 1916 approximately here.

2 through 6: Goodnews Bay Platinum Beach Placers
59 6'45.00"N,16150'9.00"W
Goodnews Bay Platinum Beach Placers:
District: Goodnews Bay
Coordinates: 5903.5'N,16148'51.5'W
Beach sands contain traces of gold and small amounts of chromite. Iron content no more than 6.1 lbs/yd3. In 1969 the unconsolidated deposits in Goodnews Bay were sampled by taking numerous core samples. Chemical analysis revealed detectable amounts of platinum in a great many of the samples. The platinum was concentrated in the clay layers rather than the sand layers. Most samples also contained both native mercury and cinnabar and a single tiny diamond was said to have been found. The best values were found along the north side of the bay, south of Beluga Peak, which consists of altered mafic volcanic rocks and fine-grained volcanogenic sedimentary rocks. There was also a small exposure of serpentine about three miles north of the bay. The source of the platinum is conjectural because the values decrease eastward towards where the Goodnews River Bay platinum placer mine is located.
Three specific locations:
1. 5905'52"N,16155'05"W to 5903'50"N,16149'23"W
2. 5900'00"N,16148'25"W to 5902'52"N,16155'05"W
3. 5906'45"N,16150'09"W

Salmon River to Hagemeister Straight Gold Beach Placers



1. Platinum-Salmon River Platinum Beach Placers
5851'36.50"N,16146'15.29"W
District: Goodnews Bay
Coordinates: 5856'N,16147.5'W
Prospecting and auger-hole sampline, mainly by US Bureau of Mines, showed that chromite made up more than 10% of the concentrates from most samples. Gold and platinum were present in most concentrates in trace to very small amounts (no more than 0.0736 ozt gold, and 0.0573 ozt platinum, per yd3). These samples showed no more than 38.4lg iron per yd3 of material in place. Lack of economically significant placers is probably because the strand line at the time of placer formation was far to the west of the present strand at a time of lower sea level. Includes references to beach of Kuskokwim Bay near Red Mountain which is the beach north of the mouth of the Salmon River to 5900. Coordinates for auger holes around Red Mountain were 5857'06"N,16146'26"W, 5856'43"N,16146'02"W, 5857'09"N,16145'16"W, 5857'08"N,16144'37"W, and 5855'05"N,16146'52"W.

2. Chagvan Bay Platinum Beach Placers reportedly saw small scale gold production between 1902 and 1914.
5845'56.94"N,16146'39.74"W

3. Slug River Beach Gold and Platinum
5836'22.04"N,16147'1.41"W
Slug River Beach Gold and Platinum reportedly worked 1903 to 1912.

4. Hagemeister Straight Gold Beach Placers
5846'47.19"N,16114'50.20"W
Hagemeister Straight Gold Beach Placers:
District: Goodnews Bay
Coordinates: 5847'N,16132'W
Gold in beach deposites Northwest of Hagemeister Island and on Slug River was probably reconcentrated from glacial deposits, though some may have been derived from nearby deposits containing sulfide minerals. Several hundred dollars worth was recovered during a small stampede in 1937. Concentrates from shovel and auger-hole samples of beach sands collected by the US Bureau of Mines contained trace amounts of chromite. Most of the 39 samples collected contained magnetite, some titaniferous, but none carried more than 7.3 lb/yd3 iron calculated for material in place, not enough to be of commercial interest.

Togiak Bay to Nunavachak Bay:



1. Togiak Bay Gold Beach Placers
59 2'47.92"N,16019'29.25"W
Togiak Bay Gold Beach Placers reportedly saw limited production with rockers during the summer of 1914.

2. Ungalikthluk Bay Gold Beach Placers
5854'45.95"N,16011'20.08"W
Ungalikthluk Bay Gold Beach Placers: This is a somewhat speculative beach placer area based upon a report of a miner working this beach with a rocker in 1914. The exact beach he worked succesfully is not certain but it was reported to be in the greater Togiak Bay near a shist outcropping with known gold ore present.

3. Nunavachak Bay Gold Beach Placers
5852'59.80"N,16002'8.57"W
Nunavachak Bay Gold Beach Placers: This is a somewhat speculative beach placer area based upon a report of a miner working this beach with a rocker in 1914. The exact beach he worked succesfully is not certain but it was reported to be in the greater Togiak Bay near a shist outcropping with known gold ore present.

Egegick, Ugashik, and Unnamed



1. Egegik Gold Beach Placers
5804'54.30"N,15735'45.43"W
Egegik Gold Beach Placers:
District: Bristol Bay
Coordinates: 5805'N,15736'W
Beach 100 yards to a mile wide made up of detritus varying in size from silt to small boulders. Table concentrates of samples taken by US Bureau of Mines in 1958-59 investigation contained more than 10% titaniferous magnetite and smaller amount of ilmenite, a few contained flour gold in trace amounts. In another US Bureau of Mines study in 1969 most of the 49 samples taken and analyzed contained from a trace to 0.003 ozt gold per ton.

2. Ugashik Beach Gold Placers
5749'59.98"N,15739'0.94"W
Ugashik Beach Gold Placers
District: Gristol Bay
Coordinates: 5750'N,15739'W
US Bureau of Mines 1969 found gold from samples up to 0.007 ozt per ton.

3. Unnamed Gold Beach Placer
5716'55.39"N,15819'07.84"W
Unnamed Gold Beach Placer located just South of Hook Lagoon worked between 1902 and 1914.

Popof Island



1. Popof Island Beach Placers
5521'21.51"N,16028'53.61"W
Popof Island Beach Placers: Gold was discovered in 1904 in beach placers on Popof Island adjacent Unga Island and $12,000 was produced in 1904-05 ;thereafter, activity moved to lode claims in the hills behind the beach, where four short exploratory shafts yielded one sample rich in gold (Atwood, 1911).

2. Popof Island Cliff Beach Gold
5521'33.64"N,16020'44.07"W
Popof Island Cliff Beach Gold: see...
http://ronreil.abana.org/popov.shtml

Quoted: Although, how I came to be in this location is a story in itself, I will reserve that for a future time. On Sunday, June 4, 1989, I found myself part of a hand picked team of geologists walking beneath the 200' to 500' high beach cliffs of Popof Island, as Bill Ellis, the head of our field operations, gave us an exhaustive introduction to the geology we would soon be prospecting for gold. Our helicopter was flying the long semicircle around the Gulf of Alaska from Seattle and would not arrive for another week, so we had lots of time for sightseeing. We were in a spectacular place of high snow capped peaks, and deep and impossibly violent ocean passages cutting into, or through, the islands. Bill impressed us all when he rolled over one of the beach cobbles and picked up several small gold nuggets lying glittering in the all too rare sunlight. He told us not to get too excited because the beach placer was already owned, and the owner wanted to sell it to us for $3,000,000! We did have the owner's permission to collect as much gold as we wanted in our "free" time. Since we worked 30 days on and 1 day off, we would not be getting rich at the placer.

Chirikof-Island



1. Chirikof Island Gold Beach Placers
5552'52.21"N,15538'34.69"W
Chirikof Island Gold Beach Placers:
District: Alaska Peninsula
Coordinates: 5555'12"N,15534'55"W
Gold-bearing beach placers are known to exist here, although the resource potential is regarded as minimal.
[1 edits; Last edit by dragline at 16:40:58 Thu Oct 29 2015]

  
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Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 2 of 4 ( 16:39:22 ThuOct 29 2015 )

Beach Gold Placers of West Coast North America (excluding Nome, AK) Part 2 of 4
(Reposted from my Alaska Gold Prospecting Forum post of 09-May-2009)

Tugidak Island Gold Beach Placers



5630'16.91"N,15430'40.65"W
Tugidak Island Gold Beach Placers
District: Kodiak
Coordinates: 5624'06"N,15445'43"W
Natives reportedly recovered gold from beach placers, although the precise location is uncertain.

Southwest Kodiak Island



1. Bumble Bay, Kodiak, Alaska
5716'53.40"N,15440'50.56"W
Gold placers reportedly worked here between 1902 and 1906.

2. Mouth of Red River, Kodiak, Alaska
5716'14.77"N,15437'16.55"W
Beach extending Southeast from the Mouth of Red River 6 miles to the mouth of the Ayakulik River was worked off and on from 1895 through the 1930s. This beach has reportedly been worked as recently as the 1970s.

3. Mouth of Ayakulik River, Kodiak, Alaska
5711'48.79"N,15432'21.84"W
Beach extending Southeast from the Mouth of Red River 6 miles to the mouth of the Ayakulik River.

4. Kodiak Island, West Gold Beach Placers
57 8'3.78"N,15431'29.08"W
District: Kodiak
Small scale beach mining before 1895 to as recently as 1952. Beach placers operations yielded mostly gold, but small amounts of platinum, iridium, and osmium were also recovered.

5. Kodiak West Beach Placer Mine
5658'29.65"N,15426'31.44"W
Reported location of the Kodiak West Beach Placer Mine circa mid 1950's to early 1970s.

6. Cape Alitak Gold Sand Dunes
5653'38.23"N,15416'44.22"W
Cape Alitak Gold Sand Dunes
District: Kodiak
Coordinates: 5651'N,15418'W
Near Cape Alicak in the extreme southern part of the island Kodiak, showings of placer gold were reported to have been found on the Red River. Narrow barrier beach extends NW from Cape Alitak which is underlain by quartz diorite. Material in beach evidently derived from glacial deposits in bluffs behind west coast beaches northward to and beyond Ayakulik River, Karluk quadrangle. Dune sands have been piled up by winds from NW sweeping across barrier beach and dropping their load at the low, narrow neck of the land between Cape Alitak and Tanner Head NE of the Cape. For several years as of 1935 a small amount of gold has been recovered from these dune sands, which also contain a large amount of magnetite.

7. Cape Alitak, Kodiak, Alaska
5651'12.97"N,15418'9.73"W
Beach extending 4-1/2 miles North from Cape Alitak worked 1902 to 1914.

Northwest Kodiak Island, Alaska



1. Rocky Point, Kodiak, Alaska
5739'48.89"N,15411'44.83"W
Beach extending 5 miles East from Rocky Point to Bear Island was extensively worked between 1895 and 1914.

2. Sevenmile Beach Gold Placers
5739'6.39"N,154 6'58.30"W
District: Kodiak
Coordinates: 5739'N,15406'W
Sand and gravel beach in front of bluffs of till from which gold was concentrated by wave action rests on planation surface cut on till. Placer mining in 1911 and 1912 with most gold found in stretch of beach 3-3/4 miles along shore on "clay bedrock" located from 1 to 6 feet below surface in pay streaks 12 to 18 inches thick. Some nuggets weighed up to 0.25 penneyweight were recovered. High paying streaks were reportedly worked out by late 1912.

3. Bear Island, Kodiak, Alaska
5739'10.65"N,154 3'28.29"W
Beach extending 5 miles East from Rocky Point to Bear Island was extensively worked from the late 1850s to as recently as the 1930s.

4. Miner's Point, Kodiak, Alaska
5753'31.90"N,15343'5.96"W
Beach extending East from Miner's Point to Broken Point worked extensively from 1895 to 1914.

5. Broken Point, Kodiak, Alaska
5752'53.14"N,15337'35.00"W
Beach extending East from Miner's Point to Broken Point worked extensively from 1895 to 1914.

6. Uganik Gold Beach Placers
5756'35.81"N,15331'21.31"W
District: Kodiak
Coordinates: 5756'44"N,15330'56"W
Beach placer gold lies at foot of low alluvial bluffs. Considerable gold recovered in the early 1900's and possibly as early as the late 1890's as well.

Raspberry Island, Alaska



1. Raspberry Island, South Beach #1
58 3'22.25"N,15323'16.84"W
District: Kodiak
Reports of limited beach gold production on many of the South facing beaches of Raspberry Island, Kodiak, Alaska, from 1902 to 1914.

2. Raspberry Island, South Beach #2
58 2'59.99"N,15317'26.09"W
Reports of limited beach gold production on many of the South facing beaches of Raspberry Island, Kodiak, Alaska, from 1902 to 1914.

3. Raspberry Cove Inlet, South Beach #3
58 3'1.83"N,15313'44.06"W
Reports of limited beach gold production on many of the South facing beaches of Raspberry Island, Kodiak, Alaska, from 1902 to 1914. The beach located at the mouth of Raspberry Cove Inlet was specifically mentioned although no mention as to which side of the cove was worked most profitably. Inspection of satellite images seem to show better prospects located on the East side beaches (speculation).

4. Raspberry Island, South Beach #4
5759'12.84"N,153 2'57.48"W
Reports of limited beach gold production on many of the South facing beaches of Raspberry Island, Kodiak, Alaska, from 1902 to 1914.

Anchor Point to Ninilchik



1. Anchor Point to Homer Gold Beach Placers
5941'54.11"N,15146'53.52"W
Anchor Point to Homer Gold Beach Placers: Gold beach placers were worked in the early 1890s between Anchor Point and Homer and thease early operations were believed to be the original stimulation for white settlements at Anchor Point and Homer. Hundreds of men worked these beach placers up until 1898 when news of the rich Klondike gold strikes caused the majority of the beach miners in this area to abandon their operations.

2. Ninilchik Gold Beach Placers
60 7'47.40"N,15132'44.25"W
District: Homer
Located in the Cook Inlet, Ninilchik gold beach placers were commercially worked during the summer of 1911 at a location approximately 6.8 miles north, northeast of the town of Ninilchik.

Point Woronzof Beach Placer Gold



Point Woronzof Beach Placer Gold
6112'14.49"N,150 1'5.45"W
There has been substantial amounts of beach gold taken in the area of Point Woronzof, just North of the end of Anchorage airport runway 14, Anchorage, Alaska. Most reports say that very fine gold is found in very thin black sand layers found near the surface and up to about 12 to at most 18 inches deep. You will note from Google Earth satellite views of Woronzof Point that the thick mud banks are swept clear of the point by tides and currents. The mud free beach areas extend about 1/2 mile East and about 3/4 mile to the Southwest (total placer gold bearing beach length is approximately 1-1/4 mile). From first hand reports I have heard from people that have successfully worked this beach the recoverable gold increases the further away from the point you go as the beach gravels and sands give way to the mud flats to either side.

Middleton Island Gold Beach Placers



Middleton Island Gold Beach Placers
5924'22.88"N,14622'27.15"W
District: Prince William Sound
Middleton Island Gold Beach Placers: The beach along the bluffs at the southwest end of Middleton Island was the site of small-scale placer gold mining as early as 1901 and as late as 1912. Beach placers at southwest end of island at foot of bluffs was reportedly the source of 387 ounces of gold in 1901. Gold and accompanying garnet concentrated from late Cenozoic Yakataga Formation which is made up of flacial marine clastic material orginally derived from ountains north of Gulf of Alaska and having gone through one or more cycles of deposition. Gold is flat and in small grans and nuggets. The largest nugget reported from this beach was 0.8 pennyweight.
[1 edits; Last edit by dragline at 18:00:30 Thu Oct 29 2015]

  
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 16:42:27 ThuOct 29 2015 )

Beach Gold Placers of West Coast North America (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4
(Reposted from my Alaska Gold Prospecting Forum post of 09-May-2009)

Prince William Sound Gold Beach Placers



Note Regarding the location of the Red Head gold beach placers I have seen conflicting information regarding the exact location, and I have listed two possible locations here. If you can help me figure out which one is the real location let me know! Is it #1 or #2?

1. Red Head Beach Placers #1
6041'2.61"N,14627'36.33"W
Gold District: Prince William Sound.
Description: Gold in beach placer derived from glacial gravels. A man can averate 1 to 7 pennyweights gold per day. Pieces as larges as 1.2 grains found. Lots of black sand reported. Placers are apparently beach wave concentration of glacial grael banks visible along shore. Ruby sand bens reported up to 3 feet thick (Cobb, 1979, OF 79-973, p. 46). Samples taken from a gravel bar averaged 0.0002 ozt/yd3. Red Head Gold Beach Placers: This beach placer site represents about two miles of the shore of outer Port Gravina between Red Head and Hell's Hole. The map site is about at the mid-point of the beach placer. It is in the E1/2 sec. 4, T. 13 S., R. 8 W., of the Copper River Meridian. The site is accurately located to within 2000 ft. This location as site P-18 in Jansons and others (1984).

2. Red Head Gold Beach Placers #2
6041'58.72"N,146 9'16.77"W
Red Head Gold Beach Placers: This beach placer site represents about two miles of the shore of outer Port Gravina between Red Head and Hell's Hole. The map site is about at the mid-point of the beach placer. It is in the E1/2 sec. 4, T. 13 S., R. 8 W., of the Copper River Meridian. The site is accurately located to within 2000 ft. This location as site P-18 in Jansons and others (1984).

3. Copper Sands Island Gold Beach Placers
6022'38.58"N,14555'3.65"W
Copper Sands Island Gold Beach Placers: Reimnitz and Plafker (1976) report that the sands extend offshore to depths up to 50 m. They also report that the beaches of the Copper River delta contain as much gold and other heavy minerals as beaches that have been mined elsewhere along this coast. One analysis from a 5-cm-thick surface layer from the west end of the island contained 0.25 ppm Au (Reimnitz and Plafker, 1976).

Whale Beach to Wingham Island



1. Whale Beach Marine Placer Gold
6010'34.20"N,14434'32.10"W
Gold Dirstrict: Yakataga.
Marine placer deposit of fine gold reported in beach sands with no record of production (Hoekzema and Fechner, IC 9091, p. 12, 30).

2. Wingham Island Gold Beach Placers
5959'17.94"N,14422'4.36"W
District: Yakataga
Coordinates: 600'30"N,14422'40"W
Gold reported to be in beach sands. Wingham Island was called Little Kayak Island on older maps. Most of island is in Cordova quadrant, but part most exposed to Storm waves appears to be in Middleton Island Quadrant.

Yakataga to Icy Bay Gold Beach Placers



1. Beach Placer Claim for sale near Cape Yakataga
60 4'32.25"N,14228'59.81"W
Beach Placer Claim for sale located from the mouth of the Kaliakh River near Cape Yakataga, to 7.75 miles to the other side of Cape Yakataga. The lease extends from mean high water line to 1/4 mile (1,320 feet) off shore. The lease comprises approximately 1,410 acres of beach sand with assayed recoverable gold ranging from a low sample of 0.060 ounces per ton to the highest sample of 2.6 ounces per ton, according to the 1975 Bureau of Mines Report surveying the Cape Yakataga area. Documented production of this area exceeds 3,500 ounce of gold.

The present beach is approximately 400 to 500 feet wide and with a slope of between 10 and 25. Violent storms periodically move large amounts of gold bearing beach placers up and down the slope of the beach many thousands of time per storm event. These repetetive movements concentrate the gold in these placers into very thin pay streaks that are easily observed by their ruby red appearance. Because these Cape Yakataga beach placers contain very little black (magnetic) sand the presence of visible black sand in beach strata changes the ruby red paystreaks to a darker purplish color. These dark purple paystreaks can yield gold at very high concentrations of up to 2.7 ounces per ton. The largest Ruby Red paystreaks were observed to be 18 to 20 inches thick following huge storms that hit the cape in the Fall of 1903. Gold partical size ranges from microscopic to approximately, and rarely, 1 gram.

The total 1,410 lease acres are split between three leases as follows:

Lease #536944, Lease #536970, Lease #536945

Asking price: $950,000 +3% GSR

The richness of this ground is attributed to the concentrating action of the ocean waves on the beach, so in essence you are processing only gold concentrate. The most recent production was in the 1970s by one man. He recovered 78 ounces of gold ($50,700.*) in 24 days using only a shovel and a small sluice box.

These are 20 year leases with option to renew. There is currently 6 years remaining on the lease. Mining permits allow production between May 1st and December 31st until the year 2009. Permits are renewable every 5 years and transferable with sale of leases. Permits include chemical froth floatation cells.

http://www.westernminer.com/claims/YakatagaGold/YakatagaGold.html

2. Icy Bay Beach Gold Placer Mine
5959'14.50"N,14130'45.86"W
Charter Resources Inc. mined beach placer sands at Icy Bay, using a backhoe and an elevated sluice. Icy Bay is east of Cape Yakataga. The Cusac Ltd. beach placer at Cape Yakataga was idle in 1988. (5959'14.50"N,14130'45.86"W)

3. Icy Bay Beach Placer Mine, Moraine Island
5955'28.57"N,14122'54.98"W
Icy Bay Beach Placer Mine, Moraine Island. This beach placer mine was operated in the 1970's with a back hoe feeding a sluice by pumping seawater from Icy Bay. Gold production is not known for sure but it was likely more than 1/10th OzT per cubic yard. The beach placer mine directly on the other side of Icy Bay appears slightly larger than this mine.

4. Yahtse-Yana Gold Beach Placers, Western
5952'3.43"N,14123'3.21"W
District: Yakataga
Western extent: Trace to small amounts of chromite, gold, magnetite, ilmenite, rutile, sphene, and zircon in concentrates of samples of beach sand. Concentrations probably too small to be of commercial interest.

5. Yahtse-Yana Gold Beach Placers, Eastern
5952'3.43"N,14123'3.21"W
District: Yakataga
Eastern extent: Trace to small amounts of chromite, gold, magnetite, ilmenite, rutile, sphene, and zircon in concentrates of samples of beach sand. Concentrations probably too small to be of commercial interest.

6. Sitkagi Bluffs Gold Beach Placers
5942'9.01"N,14028'30.11"W
District: Yakutat
As much as 16ppm (that's half an ounce per cubic yard) Au from beach placer samples taken by Cobb (1979).

Yakutat Mining District



1. Yakutat Bay Gold Beach Placers
5946'54.15"N,13958'38.77"W
District: Yakutat
Everywhere they looked they found gold here, but only rarely in paying quantities. The Yakutat Bay has been internittently beach mined for gold since 1886 or 1887 via small scale with very little production. Roport of Eleventh Census Gold excitement in 1886 to 1887 indicated miners were getting 2 ounces gold per cubic yard of black beach sands until oil from dead dogfish interfered with amalgamation and a tidal wave wiped out the paying black sands in 1888.

2. Logan Beach Placer Gold
5949'35.60"N,13936'8.36"W
District: Yakutat
Small production of only a few ounces per year in early 1900's from beaches. Miners used rockers and mined only after rains when water was available from a small ephemeral stream. Miners made only small subsitance wages.

3. Khantaak Beach Placer Gold
5937'54.80"N,13943'22.51"W
District: Yakutat
One of the sites of early beach placer mining in Yakutat Bay. At least 145 ounces Au were sluiced out by a 3 man operation in 1891. Total production likely not more than a few thousand ozt Au. Recent survey by Cobb (1979) indicated beach placers averaged 0.00052 ozt Au per yd3.

4. Blacksand Beach Platinum Placers
5926'1.94"N,13933'14.71"W
Blacksand beach reportedly rich in platinum placers.

5. Yakutat Beach Placers
5920'19.14"N,13917'49.64"W
About 3,500 ounces of gold were produced from beach sands extending for 50 miles southeast of the City of Yakutat. Associated minerals are platinum, iron and titanium. The beaches contain an estimated 6 million cubic yards of gravel containing 1% titanium.

Cape Fairweather to Lisianshi Inlet



1. Cape Fairweather: Glacier Bay National Monument
5848'19.60"N,13756'44.57"W
Cape Fairweather is the Northern boundary of the costal limits of Glacier Bay National Monument where gold beach placers were worked previously to the withdrawal of these lands from active mining in 1939.

2. Lituya Bay Gold Beach Placers, North
5839'0.31"N,13740'49.99"W
District: Yakutat
Beach placers discovered and mined by Russians as early as the 1780's. Total production by Americans between 1890 and 1917 was approximately 3,625 ozt gold as well as a little platinum. Mining continued through 1940 but production was small. Placers are located from 2 to 16 miles NW and 4 to 9 miles SE of Lituya Bay. Assays of beach gold as high as 915 fine Au. Altered zones SE of bay carry a little gold. One assay showed 0.24oz per ton.

3. Lituya Bay Beach Placers, South
5835'31.86"N,13735'14.85"W
Placer mining of the gold in the sands along the ocean beach adjacent to the mouth of Lituya Bay was begun by the Americans in 1890, however, Russian miners are reported to have mined these beaches for gold as early as 1796. Lituya Bay was incorporated into Glacier Bay National Monumnet in 1939 including all coastal areas North to Cape Fairweather.

4. Oregon King Consolidated Gold Beach Placers
5830'6.24"N,13722'59.31"W
District: Yakutat
As of the late 1980s there were 36 placer claims located on this beach and probably stream and terrace deposits.

5. Lisianski Inlet Tributary Gold Beach Placers
58 6'34.91"N,13626'20.93"W
District: Chichagof
Coordinates: 5806'34"N,13626'16"W
A little gold in beach gravel at mouth of a small stream.

Juneau, Alaska



1. Treadwell Mine, Douglas, Alaska
5816'3.02"N,13422'31.46"W
See: http://www.elisetomlinson.com/treadwell
Quote: The Treadwell Mine of Douglas, Alaska, is located across the Gastineau Channel from Alaska's Capitol city, Juneau. Juneau was a booming mining town 16 years before Klondikers' gold pans filled with shiny nuggets. Then for the next six decades the Juneau area boasted three of the world's largest gold mines -- the Alaska Juneau, the Alaska Gastineau and the Treadwell. This trio of hard-rock mines produced a total of 6.5 million ounces of gold, valued at $158 million, at a time when gold prices ranged from only $20 to $35(cq) an ounce. The Tredwell itself produced in excess of 3 million ounces of gold from 28.8 million tons of gold. The Treadwell Mine entrance was located about 1/2 mile South of the town of Douglas. The Treadwell was an extremely rich hard rock mine with many miles of tunnels dug to a depth of about 500 feet below the sea level of the Gastineau Channel that separates Douglas Island from the mainland and Juneau. Some of the tunnels extended underneath the Gastineau Channel and on April 21, 1917, disaster struck the when the Treadwell, the Mexican and 700 other mines on Douglas Island flooded with seawater. Miraculously, no one was killed, but more than 1,000 miners were thrown out of work.

2. Alaska Gastineau Mine Mill Site
5815'35.77"N,13419'51.24"W
Alaska Gastineau Mine, Juneau, Alaska: The ore from the Alaska Gastineau Mine was handled more economically than any other mine in the world at the time. The actual mine from which the ore was extracted was called the Perseverance Mine and was located some 2 miles up in the hills above the Mill Site. After being mined the ore was drawn to a location about 200 yards North of the mouth of a small creek where placer gold was originally found in the 1870s. After following the rough quartz and gold upstream its source and the present mine site were established.

Gold Beach Placers near Ketchikan, Alaska



1. Cape Chirikof Beach Placers
5518'36.93"N,13339'35.44"W
Gold District: Ketchikan,
Description: A minus 80-mess stream sediment yielded 0.006-0.066 ozt/yd3 (Cathrall and others, 1993, Map MF 2217-A, Mapb).

2. St. Nicholas Channel Beach Placers
5527'30.30"N,13336'38.07"W
District: Ketchikan
A minus 80-mess stream sediment yielded 0.006-0.066ozt/yd3 (Cathrall and others, 1993, Map MF 2217-A, Mapb).

3. Doyle Bay Beach Gold Placers
5524'47.63"N,133 2'23.05"W
District: Ketchikan
A minus 80-mess stream sediment yielded 0.006-0.066ozt/yd3 (Cathrall and others, 1993, Map MF 2217-A, Mapb).

4. Ham Island Gold Beach Placers
55 9'49.66"N,13120'7.27"W
Historical beach mining activity reported at given coordinates. Recent samples revealed only traces of gold in beach placer material and in quartz float near quartz-bearing slate and graywacke bedrock.
[1 edits; Last edit by dragline at 16:53:49 Thu Oct 29 2015]

  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 16:39:36 FriOct 30 2015 )


Hey dragline, this is great stuff here.........
Thank you for posting this........:smile:

  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 17:50:31 FriOct 30 2015 )

Sure. You'll notice that I have made three posts out of four. The forth post may or may not happen anytime soon and involves more recent research on Beach Gold Placers of the States of Washington, Oregon and California.

Beach placer gold prospecting is something of a lost art form. In the 1960's I learned about beach gold placer mining from my uncles Hank and Carl who during the depths of the Great Depression of the 1930's had traveled up and down the West Coast mining beach gold. But they generally only worked the beaches during late Fall and Winter and then only after major storms had hit specific beaches the hardest.

There was a lot of competition back then to be the first prospector on a beach where there had been major waves and movement of the sands and especially if there was newly exposed bedrock or black sands. Of course these days only a very few beach miners know the art and practice it well and most of them occasionally seem to hang out here on this forum for some reason.

But to be fair, back in the 1930's and before virtually 100% of all beach mining was done with mercury. It's not uncommon today when exploring beach bedrock to find and suck up traces of mercury from crevices. With recent advances in fine gold recovery systems, thanks to Poling, Hamilton and popandsonminers, and a century or more of Winter storms to replenish the gold on our West Coast beaches, you'd think that a few younger folk would pick up the art and learn it well. And, perhaps they will.

  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 01:54:37 SatOct 31 2015 )

Well don't stop now..... I live in Oregon and can use all the help your willing to share.....:smile:

The beaches are the easiest for me to get to and deal with since my aging knees don't like scrambling over rough terrain and boulders anymore.

  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 01:48:42 MonNov 2 2015 )

You had mentioned a KMZ file but I don't see it.
Did you link it here or have you not yet added it?

  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 06:12:58 WedNov 4 2015 )

WmA,

Sorry but I did this research 6 years ago and seem to have misplaced my KMZ data. But it wouldn't be too difficult for me to generate another one (with lots of data entry at the keyboard copy and pasting all the longitude and latitude coordinates).

I've got a lot of research as yet unpublished on California, Oregon and Washington beaches and sooner or later I'll get the time to consolidate and publish that as well.

As you can tell from the Alaska data I published most of those data are purely research oriented and almost completely useless when it comes to locating areas with mining potential. But data is data and a few of those reports are down right exciting.

I also live in Oregon (Roseburg) and am planning on taking some time to work the beaches this winter if and when a major storm hits. Learning which beaches have yielded the greatest gold recovery is relatively easy but knowing how to actually go about mining those beaches for placer gold can be a completely different thing. There are so many factors involved with beach gold mining that are very different from your typical dredging operations.

Here in Southern Oregon it is completely legal to mine the beaches for gold as long as you don't use any power equipment, you don't create a nuisance and you stay away from city limits and parks. The good thing about mining in the winter is that the beaches tend to have a lot fewer people on them and those people that do walk the beaches tend to be more curious than interested in hassling you. Even when you are close to a city as long as you're not in view of residential areas people tend not to notice or care.

I haven't talked at all about beach placer gold mining equipment but given the no power equipment rule here in Oregon it's challenging to move enough material to recover more than a few pennyweight from a hard days work, at least from my experience. So I tend to rely a lot on prospecting first, sampling second and mining third with the vast majority of prospecting days not progressing to mining days.

After a heavy winter storm you'll want to walk the heaviest hit beaches looking for areas where bedrock might be exposed. It's rare but it does happen. Otherwise you'll want to look for black mineral sand layers called lenses. You can find them by digging a trench a foot or two deep and up the beach perpendicular to the shore in the areas hit the hardest at high tide. You'll find a lens of black sand in cross section which you'll want to sample pan for color. If color is found you'll want to remove the overburden and sluice the black mineral sands only. All blond sands are worthless and thin layers of black sand are also worthless. The thicker the black sand layers the better their potential.

Another strategy is to go deep. That's what the early miners did back in 1853 through 1855 at Whisky Run Beach, Randolph, Oregon. There were more than a hundred miners across a 200 yard section of beach with so many fist fights breaking out that when the district sheriff first arrived on scene he made each miner stake out a 10 foot by 10 foot claim and that was all that one man could work at a time. The miner would use lumber and planks to shore up the sides of their shafts all the way down through the sand digging straight down to bedrock where the richest gold lay.

If reports are to be believed the first few dozen gold miners on Whisky Run Beach were recovering upwards of $1,000 per day at $10 per ounce. If you do the math figuring one man moving 5 cubic yards per day with a recovery rate of about 35% those virgin black sands were yielding up to 60 to 80 ounces of gold per cubic yard! Now those were the days.

The beach mining at Whisky Run was good until a huge winter storm in 1855 stripped the beaches bare. All the gold bearing mineral sands were completely gone with worthless blond sands redeposited in their place. Theoretically, all that gold could be sitting offshore waiting for another mega storm to push it back up onto the beach, assuming it hasn't already happened sometime in the last hundred years or so.
[5 edits; Last edit by dragline at 06:23:41 Wed Nov 4 2015]

  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 15:05:49 WedNov 4 2015 )

Thank you for the info dragline.
I have a some info and KMZ files on Oregon but it is limited, here is a link to a site you may already be familiar with.
Oregon Gold Hunters
That page will take you to the county listings and there is a KMZ file for known occurrences for each county.
You do have to sign up to get access though...

I also have files from the USGS for surface, placer, and offshore historic and current workings.

I have talked to Calum Stevenson in Coos Bay he is the forest circus guy to talk to about beach mining, anyway the permits have been done away with and no longer needed. but said you might info the local ranger if in doubt...... Yeah and NO power equipment, not even solar..... BUT I ask hime about a manual pump like a big hand powered bilge pump and he said he thought that would be OK since it is hand powered.

I live in Florence and anytime you get up this way give me a call, we'll go look at some beaches and maybe even move some sand......:smile:

There is a beach just a little way north of me that has some history and I have gone to it a few times to move a little sand with some results. i have not dug in to locate what you call a lense, but the beach shows a lot of black sand as well as some red and green sands.
Here are some links to pics of the beach..

Sands

More sands

And more sand

Some of the beach

Those were taken last spring.

Whaleshead Cove is another with HUGE amounts of black sands showing, we went down there last early spring but the results were far from breathtaking, with that said I have to admit we did not put out much effort.... more of a look see than an excavation.....lol
I have also poked around Nesika Beach which is just north of Gold Beach. there has been a lot of activity there and some fairly aggressive.

Anyway I know of several areas but was unfamiliar with the techniques used buy the historic miners and have found little on the web that I would consider high value..... That is until now.

Best regards.
William..... aka johnedoe


I will PM you my phone number. I would really enjoy talking with you sometime.

  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 18:44:08 WedNov 4 2015 )

WmA,

Here are some photos for you to contemplate...



The Long Tom sluice was a very popular tool for larger beach mining operations. Mercury was used universally in efforts to extract the finer gold (sub-50 mesh) but as you can see in the photo the set-up and design of the sluice was primitive at best. I read a study put out by the Bureau of Mines in the late 1880's that surveyed the then operating mining operations of Southern Oregon beach miners using the state-of-the-art (for that time) chloride extraction assay methods. They determined that recovery efficiencies ranged from the mid-twenties percent to as much as the upper forties percent with an average of around 38%. Clearly these miners you see in this photo were recovering significantly less than half the recoverable gold at best.



Reported from numerous accounts the Million Dollar beach and one of the most well known gold placer beaches other than Gold Beach was that of Whiskey Run. The diggings were far richer than any other but also far more concentrated over a fairly short section of about 200 yards of coastline, mostly situated to the south of the current mouth of Whiskey Run Creek. The sands were mostly black in those days and gold could be seen at the surface glistening in the sun's rays. Those days are long gone.



Today one can see a few areas with copious amounts of black sands up and down the Oregon coast. However, not all black sands contain significant gold. Some, as I can attest from experience, seem completely devoid of color. But if gold is present it's generally accompanied by copious amounts of black sand.

My current thinking is that going deep would be a worth while effort/experiment. But going deep requires shoring up the sand walls so as to disturb as little material as possible during one's efforts. Here's an idea I had for a folding sand wall shaft support. Of course this could be a lot more complicated than it needs to be. You'd probably be able to interlock and stack a bunch of 2"x12"s more simply for a square shaft but whatever keeps the sand from filling in from the sides as the shaft is dug deeper would work.





  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 19:25:43 WedNov 4 2015 )

Those are some great old photos.
Like you mentioned those days are gone but..... They have had a hundred years to rebuild and even today there is no serious beach miners. Plus the fact the rules restrict the amount of material you can move....wink wink.... I know of some beaches that are not very likely to be checked by the local constabulary ... of course they are a real bugger to get to.

  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 06:07:19 ThuNov 5 2015 )

Back in 1975 I built an 8 inch diameter gravity dredge using 225 feet of 8 inch heavy walled aluminum irrigation pipe. With just 10 to 12 feet of head the thing developed incredible suction power rivaling the best gasoline dredges but with absolutely no fuel, just gravity. It was awkward to set up and move around but when it was securely situated and with sufficient head it worked amazingly well.

After reading the Oregon State regs for beach mining it came to me that, technically, a gravity powered dredge would comply with those regulations. There are two possible gravity dredge designs that might be utilized for beach mining, a positive pressure system or a negative pressure system. Each design functions very differently.

A positive pressure gravity dredge works a lot like a typical gasoline dredge in that you force high pressure water through a venturi that in turn creates a suction at a nozzle which then delivers the material to a sluice. You'd merely need a long length of perhaps 100 to 200 feet light duty 3 or 4 inch diameter collapsible hose (like fire hose) that you would run down to your dredging operation from a collection point in the stream up as high (in terms of head) as one can reasonably acquire. The water from the output of the hose is then piped through a venturi that in turn would generate a suction that would pull material up through the nozzle, through a section of flexible hose and into a sluice. For a positive pressure gravity dredge I'd guess that a minimum head of about 6 to 8 feet would be required in conjunction with a highly specialized (large diameter venturi relative to the nozzle clear aperture diameter) design. Of course as a lot of dredgers have experienced all suction coupled with insufficient ambient water in the pit results in no water or material flowing into the pipe as the level of water in the pit drops to zero. Therefore a second water supply would need to be piped in to keep the diggings well lubricated.

A negative pressure gravity dredge works just like a siphon. Given enough head between the diggings and the surf at low tide one could run a 100 feet (or more as needed) of class 200 (thin wall) 3 or 4 inch diameter PVC pipe down the beach and into a sluice. At the diggings end of the pipe one would attach a four inch flexible dredge hose with nozzle. Incumbent with this siphon system would be the installation of a positive pressure supply to fill the digging pit sufficiently to keep the water level in the pit topped off so as to maintain maximal operational head. One advantage of having the high pressure system filling the digging pit is that it could additional be used for hydraulic excavation (under water) if bedrock was obtained.

Based upon my familiarity with Oregon State beach locations optimal for a positive pressure gravity dredge are rare and unlikely to be present where high value diggings just happen to be located. However, a negative pressure system would likely be supported much more frequently and most appropriately at beaches where high average wave energies have formed a higher than average gradient of the beach slope between surf and bank.

All one would need is a tripod, laser level and tape to survey a potential beach site to determine whether sufficient heads are available above to a water supply and down to the surf at low tide.

I'll see if I can generate some concept drawings with simple pressure and flow calculations at various heads for these systems so the reader might understand a little better what the heck I'm talking about with these gravity powered designs.
[5 edits; Last edit by dragline at 13:27:23 Thu Nov 5 2015]

  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 17:50:14 ThuNov 5 2015 )

While these dredge designs are definitely within the definitions the problem that you will run into is the quantity of material allowed under the regs.....
To bad we can't get the same regs as Washington.

  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 23:10:36 ThuNov 5 2015 )

WmA, Granted. Not being able to move or disturb more than 1 yard of material from a single diggings pit per day presents a severe limitation. However, I'm working on a design for a hybrid gravity powered system that would supply water at head from up a stream and then use gravity to siphon the fluidized sands from the digging pit and deliver it to a sluice situated down the slope of the beach towards the mean tide level. It's a work in progress and I really need to take the time to do up some drawings and run the numbers so as to get the concepts across. I'll also to to survey a few beaches to make sure that the heads are there and sufficient to power the systems. Until I do that it'll all probably seem cockamamie for sure.

  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 23:58:11 ThuNov 5 2015 )

Not cockamamie at all.. I have seen gravity dredges in the past and if the requirements of "head" are met they work great... and quiet..
I will be interested to see what ya come up with though....:smile:

Maybe get some large out of service fire hose... fire debts upgrade used hose from time to time. also a lot easier to carry than sections of pipe..... build a header box to attach the hoses and add some pressure as well....:confused:

I am sure you will figure it out though.:stirthepot:

  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 01:21:30 MonNov 9 2015 )

Here is an infographic detailing the design concept tree for a gravity fed water supply for a beach sluice with header box and hopper. This is not a dredge although the same plumbing arrangement could quickly be adapted given sufficient head to power a modified venturi suction dredge.


  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 03:02:39 MonNov 9 2015 )

Regarding the LayFlat hose, here is a specification table that includes some helpful information when designing a gravity fed water supply. The specific hose that I plan on buying comes from this manufacturer.
http://www.flexiblepvc.net/
...which they contract manufacture their LayFlat hoses in China (typical). It's a somewhat light duty LayFlat hose termed an "Economy" grade but for gravity fed hobby mining systems that's more than enough strength and duribility. This stuff may be light-duty but it isn't light. My 300 feet of 2" diameter LayFlat weighs in at 73 pounds. That's why I'll be cutting it into three 100 foot sections for easier packing and setup which with fittings weighs in at about 29 Lbs each.



For those that may not be familiar with gravity fed water supply systems, or gravity powered dredges, here is a couple tables that illustrates the flow velocities and rates (in gallons per minute) for both the 2 inch and 3 inch diameter hoses (or pipes).

Notice how increasing the diameter of the hose by 50% (in going from 2" to 3") has an almost 3-times increase in flow. For example, with 5 feet of head and with 300 feet of hose the 2" hose puts out 29.64 gal/min whereas the 3" hose puts out 82.52 gal/min. That's 2.71 times the flow!



  
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 04:09:31 MonNov 9 2015 )

Great information dragline, thanks for posting it. Information like this may save some poor soul a lot of grief and brain power trying to figure it all out. :brickwall:



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WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 04:20:44 MonNov 9 2015 )

That would be me, Jim... :smile:

  
AlexCaRefugee
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 02:44:10 TueMay 24 2016 )

I restored the lost KML file of the beach placers:smile: Dragline, if it's okay I was thinking of posting it as a google map that people can add locations to. I'm very interested in the idea of collaborative mapping online and I thought this would be a good base-map to get people interested in the idea. I can always reset it to an earlier saved point or the beginning if I and others save KMLs along the way. I transferred your data into a plugin I like to use for websites, it lets me download KMLs from the maps I make using it, and if GE updates I can make new KMLs from there that will be compatible if any files get corrupted from any updates.

I planned on adding more locations after yours but all the copying,pasting and converting is enough for me for now lol. I'll try to add a couple of locations tonight after I get the google map set-up and I'll post an updated KML file or link to it here.

Thanks for doing all this work, I originally got interested in researching Alaska starting with the beach placers and find them fascinating like yourself and other members here. I really felt your hard work was worth bringing back to life. If you still have the other sites handy I can try to add those later too.

It's easy obviously to just take an ARDF kml file and drop it in there but I think it's cool having just the beach locations in one map. I like the idea of people adding beach locations with source paper links, first hand accounts or locations they think are worth checking out. I have a few other base-maps to post after I get this one up and running and maybe people might be interested in adding to and working on this one or some of the others I have in mind.

I've read a lot of great posts on this forum and learned a lot here, this is my first post so thanks for having me and hopefully the restored KML is useful to someone. The KML is attached to my post. Edit KML won't attach here is a link to download it https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bx1BfYgqRh1VZlJSeV9UbUxmdk0
Thanks Alex
[1 edits; Last edit by AlexCaRefugee at 02:49:12 Tue May 24 2016]

  
dragline
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 05:20:21 FriMay 27 2016 )

Alex, WOW! I really appreciate your getting that KLM file uploaded. Here is the hyperlink for that...
KLM File
And, yes, you are welcome to post more locations and descriptions there if you like... even better if more joined in the fun!

Thanks, dragline

  
WmA
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 14:54:26 SatMay 28 2016 )

Very well done Alex.
Thank you for your contribution.

  
AlexCaRefugee
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Re: Alaska Beach Gold Placers (excluding Nome, AK) Part 3 of 4 ( 16:13:06 SatMay 28 2016 )

Cool thanks guys, no problem glad to help bring it back to life. It's always a learning experience for me mapping different areas and I enjoy reading about the different locations. I updated the KML with another location that has a geology map over-layed and some interesting papers on the location and that area. Thanks for fixing my previous link I'm going to try and get the links to work this time but I'm not too confident I can figure this out without some further research:smile:
Here is the updated KML
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bx1BfYgqRh1VTzdmZ2FlMHpicTA

Updated KML

This link hopefully takes you to the file to open an editable google maps version. I didn't add Gravina Island to this one yet but I will later.
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1K6YLiBU9Irc9ccU0kNupP2zAKsA&usp=sharing

GoogleMapsVersion
[2 edits; Last edit by AlexCaRefugee at 16:16:43 Sat May 28 2016]

  

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