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Steppegold2
18:18:24 Thu
Nov 20 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

Meanwhile, a quick lesson in Mongolian language in cyrillic script. (What the??? - Ed). Its back in Mongolia, a trip to the Opera House. Here is Mandy (8) with eyes closed standing with niece Munkhoo (23).



We get FRONT SEATS for 7$ a show. Real cheap, and right behind the Conductor. Trouble is Mandy will insist on putting her 3 barbies on the ledge behind the Conductor, so we shall get thrown out one of these days.

  
Steppegold2
18:25:14 Thu
Nov 20 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

So, life goes on in Ulaanbaatar. Some things I still have problems getting used to. In comes the wife and clunk goes a chunk on the kitchen floor...



It is fresh, frozen by Ma Nature and has just arrived in the landcruiser from a 1,200 km round trip to the middle of nowhere. As you can see, the Mongolian sense of kitchen hygiene is not quite westernised yet!

A few hours later, in comes nephew Mono to do the butchering on the kitchen floor...



For a moment, I thought Mono had carving skills, but then - OH NO I'll never use that hammer again!


:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:

I think I'll just have a salad, thanks!

As a matter of fact, 420 people out of 500 went down with Salmonella poisoning in the city, Chimee being one of the unfortunate. 50 or so are still hospitalised. Little wonder if Mongolians persist in dragging sides of meat over the kitchen floor.
:devil:

Steppe

  
Steppegold2
07:01:15 Fri
Nov 21 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

In the tradition of Bacon n' Beans threads, the content does tend to wander and (that's enough - Ed).

QUIZ TIME!!!!
Not had a quiz since the last quiz, so its time we had another...

What is Felix-of-Austria holding? (Er, a bottle of water? Ed). Yes but what else?


The device has travelled from Peru to Austria to Afghanistan and now is here in Mongolia, and its pic is posted in Alaska.
:smile:

FIRST PRIZE - a free slice of beef.
SECOND PRIZE - two free slices of beef
:devil:

Steppe

  
kringle_mining
16:32:04 Fri
Nov 21 2008

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flame on

You sould be able to hit that braclet with a a match to see if it is authentic. If it it a decorative resin then wouldn't it melt?

Ed welcome to Alaska . That side of beef your wife brought home resembles our kitchens during hunting season with our moose and caribou harvest.

Quiz answer 1. A midget batea' bah-te-ya
[1 edits; Last edit by kringle_mining at 17:12:59 Fri Nov 21 2008]

  
Eu_citzen
17:05:41 Fri
Nov 21 2008

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Re: flame on

Hey Steppe welcome back to civilization!:devil:

Lovely specimens there.

Hey Kringle nice idea.. Though I think it is his bowl for the sallad... I think this was a hint:

Quote: Steppegold

I think I'll just have a salad, thanks!


Regards,
Eu:welcome:

  
allanwcoty
17:28:40 Fri
Nov 21 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

Well Steppe, I don't know about Kringle butchering last years caribou on the floor, but I hang mine in the entry which is not heated so makes a good fridge for thawing. Still makes a mess of blood on the floor if you don't catch it. Screw a couple of picking eye's into the rafters in the kitchen and then get an ornamental to hang on them till butchering time. A week away and we should have a slab hanging again.

Is it a stainless steel coffee sippin saucer? allan


  
Steppegold2
02:31:00 Sat
Nov 22 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

Kringle - Good idea to set fire to the 'turquoise' bracelet to see if its genuine. Trouble is, I've already given it to Mandy as a present. If she thinks its real, its real, as women are always right as us men know. But I'll do the 'match test' on the next lot.

Alan - about hanging meat outside in the cold.... You'd think people would want the south-facing sunny side apartments in this city. Only the foreigners. The locals much prefer the north facing apartments, and cram the tiny balcony with a winter supply of meat in ma nature's deep freeze at minus 20-40C. Then it's so frozen that even the dogs can't eat it. Defrosting is a major operation!

  
Steppegold2
02:36:59 Sat
Nov 22 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

And the winner of the competition is...
KRINGLE - come and collect your side of beef before it thaws out in Spring!

Yes the gizmo is a mini-batea. Here are some more pics of it:





And here is a side view to show the remarkable angle of the device.



So, to make life interesting/annoying, here is a second quiz:

The mini-batea is made of steel (magnetic). But the internal lining is of something else - what is it?

Just to concentrate out minds, and our concentrate, to tell you that this mini-batea is used by ALL PROSPECTORS in parts of Peru, as THE BEST WAY of checking quartz veins for visible hard-rock gold.

So, the lining is made of, er what?
:confused: :confused: :confused:

Steppe
[1 edits; Last edit by Steppegold2 at 02:44:19 Sat Nov 22 2008]

  
kringle_mining
16:02:57 Sat
Nov 22 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

The lining would be:
the extact opposite of stainless. How about an induced liner of rust

  
Steppegold2
16:55:59 Sat
Nov 22 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

Kringle - rust? Good idea! Would slow down the heavies nicely. Sorry nope!

  
Steppegold2
17:15:35 Sat
Nov 22 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

Well, looks like I win the prize and have to eat the cow!

The answer is BONDED RUBBER...





The boggling thing is that this tiny device is STANDARD KIT among Peruvian prospectors and informal hard rock miners. Its used for testing a handful of ore crushed/milled by a geological hammer, or - less often - a quick check of tailings from a sluice. Of course it needs skill, plus good eyesight and/or good lens.

And they are not expensive. Way under 10$ each.

What does the team think?
:welcome:

Steppe

  
kringle_mining
17:34:45 Sat
Nov 22 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

I'm thinking I want one for Christmas
Ya definitely could line that stainless steel with those rubberized refrigerator magnets you bought the wife.

The possibities are endless
If you engrave a star on the back it could be a Christmas tree topper.
If you engraved a logo from Monglolia on it, it could be a functionable collecter's item which would not collect dust.

I want one

Hey since your not sharing your dinner what was the first meal from that leg of beef? How about a mongolian recipe as consolation?

  
Steppegold2
17:57:44 Mon
Dec 1 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

Hey Kringle - the main Mongolian recipe is for killing and boiling a sheep. You probably wouldn't like the recipe or you'd turn vegetarian or turn green anyway!

As this is Bacon n' Beans, almost anything can happen in the tenous realms of gold and the near-impossible.

So here we go again...

HOW TO DEFY GRAVITY AND WIN

First, take some shelled almonds and put into a mug.



Second, take some millet seed and bury the almonds in about an inch or so of the seeds.



(Steppe - this is really boring, nothin happened, the almonds just got buried - Ed). True, but lets put a bit of energy into the particles (nuts to you! Ed). OK nuts.

So just shake, rock, roll the beaker around and....

Well try it and see!

:confused:

Anyone rise to the challenge?


  
baub
19:37:33 Mon
Dec 1 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

I think the millet will work it's way under the almonds. Sorta like jacking up a house to move it, or same with a large rock in a stream. If you can wiggle a big thingy surrounded by little rough thingys, they will bury themselves . Maybe.

b

  
JOE_S_INDY
19:58:17 Mon
Dec 1 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

AAAAh HHHHa ! ! ! !

Trick Question - Depends on Specific Gravity!!!
:gonetoofar: :gonetoofar: :gonetoofar:

[ Too Many Emoticons In Post; Maximum 3 ]



Well, maybe not.

Could it be the beginnings of some tasty ingredients for ice cream for "afters" of the sheep-fest?

Well, maybe not.

How about the first two ingredients for a heart stopping alcoholic concoction to be consumed prior to 'dispatching' the sheep? OR, the ingredients for dispatching the sheep? Almonds do contain natural amounts of Arsonic - who knows about millet?

"Special Libations to be consumed later, I guess.

Hmmmmm - maybe?

Joe

[2 edits; Last edit by JOE_S_INDY at 20:04:56 Mon Dec 1 2008]



---
Wiser Mining Through Endless Personal Mistakes
 
 
Reno_Chris
00:59:40 Tue
Dec 2 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

"You gave a wizard assessment to the ecologite. The only quibble I have is about the purple mineral. For this to be ecologite ROCK it needs to be a mix of mostly omphacite (the pale green) plus garnet. Therefore by shaky logic, the purple "has to be" some sort of garnet. I hope to see more of this rock in the New Year and will try to make better sense of it. Anyway, well done - I claim to be a gee-ologists and an eek-ologist but man you're the world's first eclogeek! "

Bilbo, Steppe -

The purplish and Green rock is not Omphacite and garnet - not even close. I am quite familair with this material. Something very, very similar has been mined for years in Tanzania, in Africa. The Red purple is Ruby/Corundum - test it for hardness and you will see it is quite hard. The green mineral is Zoisite. The African material is red enough that it is called Ruby - the Afgan material is more purple. This material is used in very high quality, expensive carvings, and I have only bought a few pounds but I know a guy who has purchased tones of it in the past. Take a look at this link:
http://www.neweragems.com/details.asp?productid=797


Chris



---
Stories and Information on Prospecting For Gold:
Prospecting Information Encyclopedia
Turquoise and Gemstone Jewelry:
http://nevada-outback-gems.com

 
 
Steppegold2
01:27:54 Tue
Dec 2 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

OK well let's see what happened - hey and remember this is PARTICLE PHYSICS, like Newton and his apples and now Steppe and his nuts (yeh true :sarcastic: - Ed).

Less than 5 seconds of rock n roll and shake it all about...


Baub is the winner! And Joe I thought almonds contained cyanide, dunno about arsenic.

Anyway, t'aint now 2 do with:
NOT density (assuming all nuts have the same-ish density)
NOT settling velocity (no free-fall with crowded nuts, except on Wall Street)
NOT buoyancy (true, all the nuts probably have the same-ish buoyancy, and that's crucial perhaps - but that alone would not allow the big nuts to rise up.

I think Baub is a Particle Physicist in disguise - exactly the right answer, its all about wiggly thingies.
:devil:

(Er, very interesting for nuts, but where is the gold?? Ed). Yeah gold right, gotta stay focussed.

Using Baub's wiggly thingies model for Particle Physics, better known as the Brazil Nut effect, then it means that BIG STONES rise to the surface if surrounded by sand etc and if energy is added (shake, rattle etc). The contrary effort is by earthworms, who as Charles Darwin noted, spend much of their subterranean lives accidentally undermining surface stones that are therefore in due course swallowed up by Ma Earth.

(Er, so? Ed). Ah so, quite a lot of so and so:

1 - A shaking screen ain't just energising the small particles to fall through the screen. The Brazil Nut Effect predicts that the shaking of the screen helps to lift the bigger stones off the screen and so contributes to the big stones being flung off.

2 - A shaking table ain't just catching fine gold by means of gold being denser than the other particles. The Brazil Nut effect helps to LIFT the largest sand and silt particles clear of the table surface. It also follows that unless the film of black sand is as thin as possible (ie thin film separator) there is a risk of the largest gold particles turning themselves into Brazil Nuts so gaining lift and wobbling unsteadily across the table to freedom.

3 - A dryblower ain't just throwing off rocks by brute force, it also depends on a carpet of fines being with the rocks and so the energy of shaking and blowing with the Brazil Nut effect LIFTS the BIG STONES and so they are easily shaken off the end with the tails.

4 - a jig don't just do jigging as we are all told, it also is a Brazil Nut separator. This means that the Brazil Nut Effect enables the fine gold and fine black sand to LIFT slightly larger quartz (and of course rocks) off the jig screen while the gold and black sand fall through into the hutch.

(Steppe, but these are almonds not Brazil Nuts and those are millet seeds not small nuts at all - Ed). Hey be reasonable, this is Outer Mongolia and the only nuts that grow here are Pine Nuts and these are too oily, too tiny, and way too expensive. Actually I think almonds +millet are better for testing, as Brazil Nuts are a bit oily and too big, Walnuts are too brain-dead looking (seriously ugly) and all the Peanuts in town are roasted and salted.

So, is the Brazil Nut effect just a load of nuts, or can we make use of it when panning, sluicing, tabling, jigging... What do you think???
:confused:

Steppe

  
Steppegold2
01:32:58 Tue
Dec 2 2008

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Re: Bacon n' Beans in the Land of Lapis Lazuli

Chris - marvellous! I think you are right. Otherwise it is seriously ODD eclogite.

I will get some tests done on the rock when back in Kabul next year and post the result.

Many thanks!
:smile:
Steppe

The purplish and Green rock is not Omphacite and garnet - not even close. I am quite familair with this material. Something very, very similar has been mined for years in Tanzania, in Africa. The Red purple is Ruby/Corundum - test it for hardness and you will see it is quite hard. The green mineral is Zoisite. The African material is red enough that it is called Ruby - the Afgan material is more purple. This material is used in very high quality, expensive carvings, and I have only bought a few pounds but I know a guy who has purchased tones of it in the past. Take a look at this link:
http://www.neweragems.com/details.asp?productid=797



  
kringle_mining
17:43:02 Tue
Dec 2 2008

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[3 edits; Last edit by kringle_mining at 07:04:43 Wed May 20 2009]

  
Steppegold2
18:28:36 Thu
Dec 4 2008

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Re: Not even close?

Chris and Kringle - good debate! You guys sure have opened my eyes. When I get back to Kabul, we'll slab it and make a thin section and then we'll see...
:welcome:
Steppe

  
Steppegold2
18:39:28 Thu
Dec 4 2008

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Re: Not even close?

Funny how a day can turn out.

The day gets off to a techy start when I look for my old watch. "Its gone" the girls said. "Gone where?" I queried. "Gone" [Conversations in Mongolia can sometimes take a while...Ed]. "Yeh you said gone, but gone where?" "We had to break it." "You had to break it". "Of course we break it". "Of course of course, but why of course". Long pause. "Because you bought a new one". "Oh now I see..."
:confused: :confused:

It was like this all day...

"Get ready, Daddy, time for the picture" chimed little Mandy. Yes we had decided to do a family picture, I did remember. So, shower, best shirt, best tie, comb hair, polish shoes, hat ,coat, door, and into car. "Why are you wearing a tie?" "Er for the photo". Giggles and "you don't need a tie!" Time for me to button lips and just go with the flow and see what happens... A clue, for in the car was the Manageress lady of the Opera/Theatre/Ballet company. We pull up at a portrait studio and er well not quite as in mucky Manchester where I spent my urchin years. It was more like, indeed it actually was, a theatrical costume shop doubled up as a portrait shop. Off with tie, coat, jacket, shoes and on with something a tat more Mongolian.

Huge fussing about. Actually my rear end is on a stack of magazines, as I "have to be taller" than the others, and I "must stoop forward with hands like this" in order to be a Big Boss.

The end result was over in a flash...


What a day.
[1 edits; Last edit by Steppegold2 at 18:42:08 Thu Dec 4 2008]

  
minkos61
04:34:50 Fri
Dec 5 2008

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Re: Not even close?

Great looking family Steppe .

Ernie

  
Steppegold2
11:59:50 Sun
Dec 7 2008

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Name these minerals...

Some more pics of what's on sale in Kabul, mineral-wise. Some specimens are quite amazing.

Anyone got any thoughts on these....







  
kringle_mining
21:14:16 Sun
Dec 7 2008

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pegmatite

c-axis hexagonal prisms are the Beryl variance of
aquamarine.
The platey purplish minerals are lepidolite (rosettes too).
The white chunky prism minerals are albitized variance called cleavlandite

Billbo

  
Zooka
07:19:34 Mon
Dec 8 2008

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Re: pegmatite

Wow! Nice rocks!
Bilbo good job.
-Z

  
Steppegold2
18:12:37 Mon
Dec 8 2008

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Re: pegmatite

Congrats Kringle - excellent post. You would enjoy a trip round the mineral bazaars in Kabul!

:smile:

Steppe

  
Reno_Chris
22:55:50 Mon
Dec 8 2008

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Re: pegmatite

The dark blue-green minerals in the third photo are tourmaline. The brown/gray 6-sided crystal in photo 3 is smokey quartz. The silvery platy materials in the second photo are Muscovite mica.

Any idea on th price of these, or just whatever you can bargain the seller to let them go for.

Chris



---
Stories and Information on Prospecting For Gold:
Prospecting Information Encyclopedia
Turquoise and Gemstone Jewelry:
http://nevada-outback-gems.com

 
 
Reno_Chris
23:22:26 Mon
Dec 8 2008

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Re: pegmatite


Quote: null

Out of curiosity: What makes a Moguk Burmese ruby purple? Is it Chromium (Cr)?
Are G12 garnets purple? I don't know. I know they are
Chrome rich.

My opinion is that your samples Chris are mined in mass tonnes in africa as an industrial abrasive?
Where as Steppes rock is mined in mass tons with the hopes of exptracting a few gem quality large karat
diamonds.

Bilbo


Chrome makes corrundum turn ruby red. The combination of iron and Titanium makes corrundum turn blue (both are required). A bit of chromium, plus some iron and titanum yield a red plus blue or purple type coloration. I am real sure about this one - corundum and zoisite. In Tanzania, this material is mined for gem use - not abrasives. Some of the Tanzania material is such that the ruby will cut a star ruby. The rest is used for expensive gemstone carvings. It occurs als in a region of high metamorphic pressures - the aftican rift zone. That region also produces a number of other gems, including garnet, zircon, sapphires, scapolite (thats where most of the worlds gem scapolite comes from).

Chris



---
Stories and Information on Prospecting For Gold:
Prospecting Information Encyclopedia
Turquoise and Gemstone Jewelry:
http://nevada-outback-gems.com

 
 
Steppegold2
00:09:16 Tue
Dec 9 2008

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Re: pegmatite

Hi Chris

All you do is haggle the price. As it is a specialised subject, I don't buy - just watch the others doing it. However for dealers/collectors it would be worthwhile to come to Kabul for a week to do trade. There is excellent stuff and of course rubbish and fakes as everywhere else.

Here are some more nice examples in Kabul...






  
kringle_mining
17:19:07 Tue
Dec 9 2008

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Re: pegmatite

Pic 1: Black mineral is a tourmaline variance called schorl

Pic 2: Tourmaline green to darker blue indicolite

Pic 3: Chris this is how I picture ruby in a matrix of marble. I went in to the mindat.org and looked at Afghanistan ruby and the specimens are in a marble
and / or pholgopite matrix.

Ruby has a distinctive bright red under UV light
We could test it but I am thinking that Mr. Ed left our Ecloruby specimen in Kabul?

  

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