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kringle_mining
23:03:56 Sun
Jan 3 2010

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Re: Project area.

Section 32, 33, 5 and 4

  
aumbre
23:42:48 Sun
Jan 3 2010

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Re: Project Target #1

The most likely target will be (deep) placer gold with associated heavy concentrates. (These are all very wild guesses). Our initial efforts should focus on records of past activity - locations, depths, grades, and problems encountered. We should hire Geo Jim to do a preliminary assessment prior to recommending seismic testing for bedrock depth and drilling to test for gold distribution.
[4 edits; Last edit by aumbre at 00:07:23 Mon Jan 4 2010]

  
aumbre
00:16:22 Mon
Jan 4 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Finding a lode deposit on this property will ( in my opinion/ guess) be a longshot. TF creek may follow a fault line, are there any mineralized feature along the general strike line? Is there any exposed or shallow bedrock on the hills or ridges?
[1 edits; Last edit by aumbre at 00:20:12 Mon Jan 4 2010]

  
tenderfootminer
01:20:51 Mon
Jan 4 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

here is my maim claims locations,as for finding "lode gold"I am not sure what i am looking for is where the best promise on the bench for finding less depth to bedrock.From everything I have read and seen the entire vally has a rich layer on and above the bedrock the question is where is it feasible to reach.It is rich enough that the old timers claimed after digging 150+ft if they didn't pull an oz. out of every bucket on bedrock they dug a new shaft! when they did they drifted along following the pay.Another report says they had to pull 3oz. a day out of the hole to make it pay for the 3 man crews on each shaft.not sure how they figured it since they where using rockerboxes down there to test and doing the main "cleanup in the spring? Anyway the amount of work done here shows it was a huge project but they didn't discover the "bench"gold until after the boom was gone .I agree a lot of research has gone into this area and obviously alot of gold came out already 70,000oz. before 1910 the big wonder is how much is left and where can It be reached easiest.There has been huge open pit and hard rock mining done up above me on hinckly gulch and such as well as tenderfootcreek and everyone of the past claim holders at one time held my claims but as they got bigger they let em go to work the shallower gold upstream.One of the past holders told me it gets richer and deeper as it goes towards the mouth which is not always the case he had seen alot of core drilling and test work done and decided it would take to much money for huge dewatering pumps and equipt.His claims on upper tenderfoot do quite well and have pulled huge amounts of gold every year as its not my place I won't say how much but I will say it keeps several peoples wages payed and lets them snowbird in style in the winter :smile:does this help any?:confused:What I was going to do was start down stream on the bench from where the last claim holder was working as I know he at least made a living there And there is little evidence of the old timers working up there....ws

  
kringle_mining
07:01:46 Mon
Jan 4 2010

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Re: Project Target #2



  
tenderfootminer
07:12:35 Mon
Jan 4 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Kringle your picture and computer skills are amazing!lol I tried to post that picture for an hour!hahahahha thanks again:smile:

  
kringle_mining
21:44:23 Mon
Jan 4 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Thanks Walt.
Wiz what do you mean by "the dogbone anomaly". Could you import the mag pic into paint and draw your idea and repost it?

Also Walt as soon as you post the GPS coords . I can put them on a map and post them. Also gps in the location of the bench of which you speak.
Put the coordinates in UTM because that is what my grid reader is on mapper.

Walt could you do a depth sounding with a plub bob on the shafts, or are they caved in?

Ambre the focus of this discussion is mostly to come up with ideas on a placer target. But the brown dotted square to the east of Walt's claims is University land which are normally strategically situated....perhaps on lode ground? We need to find out why they chose this parcel.

Walt can you estimate in cubic yard the amount of gold found on the pay mounds of each shaft? A pay mound is not a tailings pile right?
Bill

  
tenderfootminer
23:09:46 Mon
Jan 4 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Kringle.I am a little lost again do you want me to go to the mine and gps mark where each shaft is?(huge huge job as they are everywhere lol) As for plumbobbing the shafts are caved in or capped or some full of ice this time of year so nope.I assumed the parcel of university land was because of archeological dig sites?maybe i wrong.On the west side on top of the bluff is a 40acre block of land nobody has givin me a answer who holds it. It shows up as no mans land maybe a native allotment?As for estimating the piles well....each is differant being as depends what depth the material was from either overburden,some have silt/rocky stuff and ocasionaly a pile of pay is found.One pile of "pay was found in the 70,s with enough gold in it he washed it in a couple days and pulled more than $40,000 which he went and bought a sawmill with lol. This is just what an old friend and employee told me.I have pulled 6oz. out of one pile and only washed 20yds or so.but like I say each pile is different Alot are away from water or in swamp and haven't been tested On another note right at the mouth there is alot of fine gold if a guy runs his 2inch.dredge slow and works an hour its easy to pick up several DWT.but it is ultra fine (why I pay so much attention to the nome beach posts)Nowhere in the creak have i found a spot that my 9 yr.old boy cant get nice color in a tank and he just sucks the top not coyoting a hole. man its boggling to try to guess what old timers where up too. I can in summer though test each pile and document what comes out of each per yard.I have noticed when I am getting nice color there are lots of small broken garnet peices with it,seems curious since up stream at my buddy's when I did cleanup for him there where lots of intackt garnets.maybe they got ground up traveling down?? just something I noticed mostly fractured peices in the piles.

  
tenderfootminer
23:31:19 Mon
Jan 4 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Thought I would add I always have people /buddys out metal detecting with my boys and the piles all have shown this they have small craters dug in the surface of em,though nuggets have come out of them alot of digging is for lead I have every kind of bullet in a jar you can imagine lots of hunters over the years have sighted in on my piles lol.However even in these piles I know of one nugget the size of a hens egg (never got to weigh it) and 2 nuggets bigger than 3 oz. as well as lots of smaller ones.Some days the boys will bring back hand fulls of bullets and junk and somedays they surprise me.last summer my five yr.old found a nice little necklace peice in a pile where people learn to pan! must have dumped it out of there classifier without looking! However I do "rerun everything anyone pans "after they leave mostly only find a little fine stuff.the amounts of amalgam in some piles makes me wonder how it got there in a pile that appears not to have been washed?but there might be an answer maybe someone restacked the piles over the years as i have found alot of old junk in some as well.I found a old wheelbarrel in the woods full of dirt it was realy root bound and had to be broke apart but was definatly pay dirt 1/4 oz in it of nice stuff I wasted days trying to walk around and find where it came from.The shafts i see are just a fraction of what was there as it has all changed I flooded an area to use as a recirc.pond and the water dissapears in funny sqaure hole!I believe either capped or collapsed shafts If ya bounce on the moss on em(not good idea!)its obvious something is hollow.I am always scared of finding one with the bobcat.ok enough rambling! :devil:

  
tenderfootminer
00:03:46 Tue
Jan 5 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Ok the bench i am looking at is the long rectangle box.I was planning on starting on the south end of it close to the river and mouth of creek(not sure why)lol the other little box with tail is where a small Highground spot is and it has shafts every50-100ft. apart all over it .The "piles here are what i have been mainly working on.the piles at the pond was made with an old bucketline and most of them have been washed over the years.mostly just bedrock chunks left.(this is where the last guy hit a pile of unwashed pay.I have never dredged in the pond however from the amounts of lost gold under the other long ton and sluiceing spots I have It is worth doing.this was where the material was carried/bucketlined to for washing in the spring.The other shafts are along the creek so I believe they washed that material in it.hard to figure why but there is even shafts in the pond?I found while in boat catching frogs with boys!I am trying to get better pic up that I can show piles and spots I have tested be patient Delta Graduate here!:devil:
[1 edits; Last edit by tenderfootminer at 00:13:52 Tue Jan 5 2010]

  
tenderfootminer
00:23:36 Tue
Jan 5 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

ok top box is where last miner lived and worked the bench rightbox is pond and shaft city Left box on the hill/bench where i was going to start not sure why i can't make picture bigger yet lol Ill work on it!
[1 edits; Last edit by tenderfootminer at 00:25:39 Tue Jan 5 2010]

  
tenderfootminer
01:39:20 Tue
Jan 5 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Geo the "dogbone" might be easy to get test rocks on as it was cut for the roadbed and also has a deep deep hole "gravelpit"cut against the bank side of it with exposed rock? just a thought.

  
tenderfootminer
02:05:40 Tue
Jan 5 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

geo I am trying to follow ya the angle of fractures and bedding? noted on the sample?little confused :confused:I can definatly get to samples of the rock cut it is steep enough there is no snow on it and the "pit is frozen so easy to walk up to cut bank however not sure what i am trying to find? just rock? lol maybe I need my hand held more hehehe If I am following you you mean the fractures in the bank and angle of topside slope from where the test rock came?
[1 edits; Last edit by tenderfootminer at 02:07:33 Tue Jan 5 2010]

  
baub
16:08:23 Tue
Jan 5 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Great post. Reads like a topflight thriller.

b

  
tenderfootminer
18:32:25 Tue
Jan 5 2010

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Re: Project Target #2

Baub I am making my sons read this post to show them what I mean when i tell em to pay more attention in school
!lol So much info and combined knowledge makes me want to take a basic geoligy/mineral class.Thanks again to all who contribute there knowledge and opinions on this and other posts:smile:

  
allanwcoty
19:40:05 Tue
Jan 5 2010

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Re: reading maps!

In regards to your mercury in piles. I haven't studied any books on your area but just got through reading one of Fairbanks history and it talked about an area too deep to get with the Big Dredges and they actually experimented with underground hydraulicing and sluicing so that the tailings were brought to the surface and left in piles. Mercury used in the underground recovery would have left some in the tailings.

What is the elevation change from where you want to start your bench cut and the river to the south?

Regards to the geology/rock ident. class, if you can get your children interested in them early, they will pick up on it much faster than our cluttered minds. They could probably keep your info updated on a computer that would be beneficial to you in the long run.

Keep at it and have a great day. allan

  
tomcat_0
02:21:23 Wed
Jan 6 2010

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Re: reading maps!

This is a fantastic thread! Not only is it a hardrock discovery but, it is an ongoing prodject.

Dean

  
kringle_mining
08:12:06 Wed
Jan 6 2010

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Re: Outline of proposed activity





  
kringle_mining
05:57:00 Sat
Jan 9 2010

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Re: Outline of proposed activity

THE RICHARDSON LINEAMENT - A STRUCTURAL CONTROL FOR GOLD DEPOSITS
IN THE RICHARDSON MINING DISTRICT, INTERIOR ALASKA
By T.K. Bundtzenl and R.D. Regerl


INTRODUCTION
The Richardson district, along the southern margin
of the Yukon-Tanana upland (fig. 1) has been a center
of gold mining since the discovery of deep gold placers
on Tenderfoot Creek in 1905 (Prindle, 1913; Saunders,
1965). Total known production is about 95,000 ounces
of gold alld 24,000 ounces of silver (Brooks, 1922; E.N.
Wolff, oral comm.). In 1976 the Alaska DGGS assessed
mineral resources in the Richardson district and mapped
a prominent northwest-trending photogeologic lineament
system that may control mineralization.





BEDROCK GEOLOGY
The bedrock of the Richardson area is composed
of metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks that have
undergone greenschist-to-amphibolite facies metamorphism
and have been intruded by Mesozoic plutons
(Foster and others, 1973). The two most common lithologies
in the area are biotite-muscovite-oligoclase-quartz
schist and muscovite-biotite-pennine-albite-quartz-actinolite
schist (unit ms in fig. 2). F.R. Weber (oral comm.)
reports sillimanite gneiss north and east of the study
area. Coarse-grained K-spar-quartz-muscovite metagranite(?)
(unit mg in fig. 2) occurs near the head of
Buckeye Creek adjacent to several outcrops of epidoteactinolite
hornfels (unit hs in fig. 2). Saunders (1965)
reported metagranitic rock in the Rosa Creek drainage.
A dark-green epidote-rich hornblende gneiss (unit hg in
fig. 2) is exposed in an open cut in Hinkley Gulch.
Hornblende from this rock has an unusually high
specific gravity ( > 3.3) and a high K20 content of
1.994 percent (table 1). The chemical composition of
the rock (table 2) and its mineralogy suggest that it was
a schist that was metasomatised and thermally metamorphosed,
perhaps during emplacement of the nearby
porphyry. Hornblende from the gneiss yields a minimum
age of 113 23.3 and 102 23.1 m.y. (table 1).
Pink- to tan-weathering sericitized porphyro-aphanitic
quartz-orthoclase porphyry (unit rp in fig. 2) is
exposed in Democrat Creek and Hinkley Gulch, was
encountered beneath Susie Creek (churn-drill boring
2 in fig. 2), and occurs in the tailings on Tenderfoot
Creek (fig. 2). Quartz and carlsbad-twinned orthoclase
' a l a s k a DGGS, College, AK 99708.
occur as large ( 1 cm) euhedral phenocrysts in an
aphanitic to fine-grained quartz-sericite groundmass, but
the feldspar is commonly altered or absent because of
weathering. The porphyry on Democrat Creek is locally
gossanized and veined with quartz, and contains disseminated
sulfide psuedomorphs. It yields a minimum
age of 86.9 + 2.6 m.y. (table I), which may date the
hydrothermal alteration and mineralization.

SURFICIAL GEOLOGY
The rounded bedrock ridges and hills are blanketed
with extensive wind-blown organic silt of variable
thickness (fig. 2). The silt has been retransported to
form valley fills that are perennially frozen and ice rich
(PCwk, 1975). The organic silt is 1 to 8 m thick in the
drainage of Banner Creek and overlies 4 to 5 m of
fluvial sand and gravel that locally contain rich placer
gold deposits.
Distinct linear features identified on aerial photographs
may represent a northwest-trending fracture
system (fig. 1). The major feature, herein termed the
Richardson lineament, extends at least 35 km from
lower Tenderfoot Creek through Democrat and Redmond
Creeks to the Salcha River. Although no exposures
of the linear were found, the Richardson lineament
appears to control the distribution of the quartzorthoclase
porphyry and the placer gold deposits.
Former production shafts, associated tailings cones, and
open-pit workings are concentrated along, downslope of,
and downstream from the Richardson lineament on
Tenderfoot, Buckeye, and Banner Creeks, in Hinkley
Gulch, and near the head of Junction Creek downstream
from the point of its beheading by Democrat Creek
(fig. 2).




GEOCHEMICAL RESULTS
Analyses of seven chip samples of gossan-rich quartz
porphyry on Democrat Creek, show anomalies in silver,
lead, antimony, and uranium (fig. 2, table 3). Porphyry
samples from Hinkley Gulch are slightly anomalous in
lead, antimony, and uranium but not gold or silver.
Lead and silver values in the porphyry are coincident
and lead-bearing gold-silver ore occurs in the tailings
of the early drift mines on Tenderfoot Creek (Saunders,
1965
Gold fineness in pan concentrates from Hinkley
Gulch and Tenderfoot Creek averages 670 (table 4),
which is typical of the low average fineness (720) for
the Richardson district reported by Smith (1941), but
the samples are small and may not be representative.
The low gold fineness, angularity of the placer gold,
and associated base-metal mineralization led Saunders(1965) to suggest that base-metal mineralization accompanied
introduction of the gold.

Pan concentrates collected during this study are rich
in titanium minerals (table 4). The presence of cassiterite
in Hinkley Gulch and monazite in drill-hole
4 (fig. 2) is unique, perhaps indicating a local source in
the porphyry plutons. Saunders (19651 reported scheelite
in pan concentrates from Democrat Creek.

CONCLUSION
In the Richardson district northwest-trending lineaments
apparently control the distribution of mineralized
porphyry bodies thought to be the source of placer gold.
Exploration along the Richardson lineament northwest
of the Banner-Democrat Creeks area may locate un.
discovered placer gold and lode deposits.














ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Special thanks are given to Gilbert Monroe, Bruce
Erickson, Robert Lovelass, and Edward Smith for
permission to examine their mining properties. We are
also indebted to the numerous people, both cited and
uncited, in particular Gilbert Monroe, who freely gave
supporting data, and Wyatt Gilbert, who reviewed the
manuscript.

REFERENCES CITED

Brooks, A.H., 1922, The Alaska mineral industry in
1921: U.S. Geol. Survey Bull. 739A, 47 p.

Foster, H.L., Weber, F.R., Forbes, R.B., and Brabb,
E.E., 1973, Regional geology of Yukon-Tanana upland,
Alaska: Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Mem.
19, p. 388-395.

T.L., 1975, Quaternary geology of Alaska: U.S.
Geol Survey Prof Paper 835, 145p.

Prindle, L.M., 1913, A geological reconnaissance of the Alaska Div. Mines and Minerals Geochem. Rept.
Fairbanks quadrangle, Alaska: U.S. Geol. Survey 3,
12 p.

Bull. 525, 220 p. Smith, P.S., 1941, Fineness of gold from Alaska placers:

Saunders, R.H., 1965, A geochemical investigation in U.S. Geol. Survey Bull. 910C, p. 147-272.
the Richardson area, Big Delta quadrangle, Alaska:
[5 edits; Last edit by kringle_mining at 22:23:42 Sat Jan 9 2010]

  
tenderfootminer
06:27:49 Sat
Jan 9 2010

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Re: Outline of proposed activity

:smile:

  
kringle_mining
01:54:22 Sun
Jan 10 2010

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Land Sat Band 7 sun angle approx 20 degrees




  
kringle_mining
02:49:49 Sun
Jan 10 2010

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Interpretation


  
kringle_mining
16:04:07 Sun
Jan 10 2010

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Re: Interpretation

Wiz,
I am not sure but one of the bushed linear cuts in the google earth image you might be a utility corridor?
So if there is a power line along side of the road, would not this effect the resistivity readings in the ohm maps posted page one?

  
kringle_mining
21:39:45 Sun
Jan 10 2010

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Re: Interpretation

my line interpretation is taken from Landsat band 7 and 5 images. Mostly winter images when the angle of the sun is at approximately 20 degrees .

There are shawdow/illuminating software for maps to high light linears from differing compass directions, but the only problem I see with this method would be ground coloration which will show up with cross cutting predominence for linears when using landsat. The younger active faults are more discolored and show more definition when crossing the longer linears than does a uniform shadowing technique.
I say coloration variances even though the landsat images were scanned in black and white.

Oh , I did this map about 15 years ago and it is my own subjective interpretation. The Bundtzen line map was done with photogeology. You can see his line interpretation of the Richardson lineament follows the Tenderfoot creek drainage.

  
kringle_mining
05:05:10 Sat
Jan 16 2010

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Geology vs. Ohms 7200

Below is a map to map comparison of geology and resistivity for the vicinity of the Stockwell mining claims

I interpret the resistivity map via what I term the "can opener method" of which I will explain later.
The main thing to comprehend when interpreting ohm resistance maps is the wetness and acidity of the soil over conductive or non conductive bedrock. The acidity of the soil when diluted with water promotes a saline or electrolyte potential/ possibility.




The other thing to put into your mind is that alot of moisture and acidity/saline waters are trapped along the fault traces.

In fact my landsat linear map overlays almost perfectly
over the ohm map linears.

Bedrock is in blue on the ohm map because exposed bedrock is too dry to conduct current. Much like a dead car battery without water in it.

  
kringle_mining
19:30:17 Sat
Jan 16 2010

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Generalized Manuel for Interpretation

Here is a link to interpretation of these maps

Portfolio of aeromagnetic and resistivity maps of the southeastern extension of the Salcha River-Pogo survey, Goodpaster mining district, east-central Alaska

Authors: Burns, L.E.
Publication Year: 2002
Publisher: Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys




[4 edits; Last edit by kringle_mining at 22:44:23 Sun Jan 17 2010]

  
kringle_mining
22:54:10 Sat
Jan 16 2010

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Re: Geology vs. Ohms at 7200 htz.

Here is some further interpretation.
Note: Bedrock in the river is not blue due to the "can opener" effect.
Rainbow ohm contrasts have taken a step due to higher conductivity at the watertable interface. Water saturation in gravels goes clear to bedrock in the resevoir saturated hues of purple.



I'll post a couple more maps to round off the evening

  
kringle_mining
00:27:12 Sun
Jan 17 2010

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Barrier wall interpretation at 7200 htz.

Here is my interpretation of the magenta shallows.
The possiblities for theses barriers exist. When I say barrier or wall I mean a risidual rock or weathered up thrown fault that has with stood the erosional impact of time, chemistry, and water erosion .



Pretty cool

  
kringle_mining
01:33:23 Sun
Jan 17 2010

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Re: Barrier wall interpretation at 7200 htz.

Up creek from the the Stockwell claims we have more potential (ohm) barriers plus uniform bathymetry of conductive circles which needs an explanation.

[1 edits; Last edit by kringle_mining at 02:21:56 Sun Jan 17 2010]

  
kringle_mining
02:39:41 Sun
Jan 17 2010

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Re: Barrier wall interpretation at 7200 htz.

This exhalitive that you mention is fissure dike related
but it is more of a graphite exhalitive rather than VMS.
The Vms is about 50 miles south, away in the Alaska Range
google: Bonnefield VMS
There is too much primary gold recovered in placer to
indicate a VMS.
We have retro amphibolite facies rocks in this location with Cretaceous granites intruding the older schist and gneiss bodies. The dikes are significant and so would the echelon veins as you drew them Wiz if they exist as predicted.
This study is only to isolate an improve placer production on the Stockwell claims. The lode source would be a bonus.

  

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