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Talachulitna_Jim
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 02:24:06 FriFeb 2 2007 )

I regularly get those darn nuisance Bigfoot in my marten traps. Sure wish their fur was worth something!

Only good thing is that you can snare up their carcass and get some wolves coming into the kill site.

Jim

  
wildland
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 07:41:35 FriFeb 2 2007 )

The main trouble with us humans believing in such an animal is we never seen one.. lived here for 29 years before I saw my first wolverine alive running around..30 years before i saw a marten in the wild. Now I have trapped and been the outdoors most of my life. Guided hunters for 6 years. built cabins all over and spent many many hours in the woods. Now the last wolverine track I saw was 8 years ago.now you take a bears strength and 10% of our intellgence with woods smart and you have a elusive animal. Migration is another thought,moving as did the people of old to salmon moose caribou. What can they eat?omnivores. Ive seen a hare eat half a squirrel out of y trap! Anything is possible...most myths and legands are the elders way of teaching us. The lore of bigfoot by the elders is nothing of the sort. These accounts not lessons.

  
prairiegrouse
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 06:41:56 FriMar 2 2007 )

ALL of the great detail in this report...and the facts of the forest???? ARE FALSE...there are no trees here....

I have seen it...willow the size of my index finger constitue old growth... that slip up enough tells me the rest of it is also fiction.... the trees end on the south side of the Brooks Range and pentrate meagerly up south facing slopes to within 20 miles of the crest or continental divide...north of the divide head high brush can be found tightly lining some watercourses...in no way might anyone with forest experience use the word forest to describe the sparse brush.

Willow brush yes...forest hardly.... pure rubbish!


  
wildland
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 09:59:29 FriMar 2 2007 )

Even though I the BFRO reports are fun to read and some maybe true,,like I said I offerd info of facts not rumors,,,I gave accounts of village life without and with the Haiy man around, I offered general locations and why most sitting are never reported, Hell I offer my services as a guide an place to base out of. I got a yeah tnx later dudde response. I dont like BFRO cause of the trips they make is the US and charge for it. Its not an animal you run out and find like a Hare or red squirrel. Again we as humans dont believe it cause we havent seen it or found it. an Agin I have lived in the woods for months and been all over by ever method of transportation in Alaska. Hence my name Ive fought fires and travel more walking miles than most humans. IF anyone should be against the thought it is me. As for the forest comment...even if it is Blackspruce it is a forest,,and debating trees is NOT why i started this thread. I know they arent doug fir towering over the planet but yes they qualify as forest,,the avg age of a 3.6 " Black spruce is 115 yearss old.

  
prairiegrouse
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 17:10:50 FriMar 2 2007 )

there are no conifers at all..not even a single scraggly black spruce... Kansas has more forest than the North slope...I guess the only forest comparison could be with the moon...the north slope and the moon look very similar...

I wont even get into the fact or fiction of the beast.....

just the facts in their story are panning out like fiction of someone who made up a story and hadnt been there before...or provided that tidbit of dense forest to weed out those in the know...and the gullible.

  
wildland
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 05:16:03 SatMar 3 2007 )

HUH? The Brooks start thenorth slope..

  
Thulefoth
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 01:16:47 SunMar 4 2007 )

With the Hobbit remains found on Floriensis Island, all the cards & chips done hit the floor. What we thought for sure was worth nothing but a hoot 'n a wink, is now pretty much up for grabs again.

However, those who hold for a giant, living-fossil or parallel-evolution primate surviving in, not to mention, 'throughout', 21st c. North America, have themselves a 'special' challenge. According to 'reports', there should be a resident clan o' Bigfoot (i.e., a breeding-population) in every nice patch of the continent still left.

But the continent has been settled for a 100 years, by a heavily armed & trigger-happy culture. They flat-out exterminated the predators from the Lower 48. But not one skull or hide from a Bigfoot..

In airplanes, folks go out to spot the tracks of game - little-bitty tracks, show up like highways in the snow. Big-game sign, you can see from clean over the horizon. That's a tough one for the Bigfoot-in-the-North folks, real tough.

The onus is on folks like you, wildland, who want an extremely large collection of 100% unsubstantiated "reports", coupled with Native lore, to be accepted as indicating a certain likelihood that Bigfoot might therefore be real.

No - it is instead up to you to be patient and of good cheer in the face of disbelief, and even scorn, particularly when you choose to 'insist', or to push your thesis.

I like, respect & support the Natives. But like the Europeans, the Tribes have an entire menagerie of beasts & beings, none of which can be found on planet Earth. You can't have it run hot 'n cold at the same time: if Native Bigfoot lore means we just got to look harder, because they must be there, then it also means we got to look harder for Thunderbird, and a dozen more like it.

In fact, the Native traditions speak of many creatures of far greater importance than any Bigfoot., for which there is nothing like the assertion of Bigfoot-supporters, that because they live in the Native culture, then they must breath air too, and we will surely find their scat in the remote hills, when we but look hard enough.

I will assert that to the person, everyone here would be thrilled to the core, absolutely electrified, if it turns out that a huge anthropoid really does live in our far woods. That is, until they start cleaning our sets for us ... :smile:

All you guys (and gals) that did time in the military, raise your hands. Now, all of you that would go out on an Arctic training exercise, then turn around and walk away from a Bigfoot within earshot ... That's what I thought - no hands!

Gimme a break ... oh, and they don't go out on those training missions without live ammo, fer Pete's sake. The BFRO report is bogus. :gonetoofar:

Did I ever see one? No, though I did see great striding tracks coming down a snow-slope in the high Olympic backcountry ... made my hair stand up stiff. But the prints were indistinct, coulda been a cat bounding, or whatever.

But hear this. I'm a rock-solid type, yet I had this weird, audio-only dream, 4 days into the backcountry, about my step-dad telling me how he ran a drill-bit through his finger. Thought about it, repeatedly, while still out. Went home, walking into a crowded house-party, and there he was, big bandage on his hand. "Oh, no way!", I think to myself. He walks over, starts telling me the story I heard in the dream, 4 days ago ...

If Bigfoot lives, it is because something seriously 'unknown' is going on ... like the occasional odd mental experience that many of us have had... :confused:

Ted Clayton

  
wildland
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 09:07:47 SunMar 4 2007 )

I dont push my thoughts on anyone,,i agree BFRO is bovine scatology I have stated that. We have been trawling the oceans for centuries yet 2 new spieces of fish have showed up in the past 5 years. Frogs of south america 12 new species in the past 15 years,,,Plants discobered everyday. Biolocial facts along with layman discoveries dont prove a certain speciese exsist or not. My original question was but a question. I will get no financial gain or am I starting a new religion or cult. A mere inquiry. The tracks I saw and followed no human could have done. Now the Mad Trapper of Rat River was the first known man to cross the white mountain in winter, He did it on snowshoes with a 100lbs pack. had eaten a red sqirrel and a cammp robber. Many lore or tales are teachings. But bigfoot is never taught. Only spoken when asked about and then most of the time you get nothing.,,,Please continue to post or PMme with anyones stories no names will go further than me.

  
ivantherussian03
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 04:31:37 TueMar 20 2007 )

I did research on this very subject. Lots of stories in villages of Alaska about bigfoot, but lots online too. But I am skeptical of internet, but there is alot there.

Everytime a time an animal is thought to be extinct; some amatuer finds one alive kicking. Lots of examlples of that out there. Ivory Billed Woodpecker, being recently example in news a year or so ago. It was thought to be extinct 80 years ago. In the 1970's sea cows were being sighted in the Russian Arctic, but never proven to be real.

I dont have first hand knowledge of bigfoots. My buddy has seen one between Pilot Station and Saint Marys, on the river. Most bigfoots go un-reported in AK when they are seen.

The story of special forces sounds plausible, except for some of the possible errors people here have pointed out. Most soldiers I knew, and when I one never went out of there way to find trouble. They may have had weapons, but that does not mean they carry huge amounts of ammo, if any. It would depend on the training they were doing. I did alot of training, and never carried ammo unless we were going into action. I would think Special Forces would carry both.

My research found sound recordings on the internet: whistles, banging, and whooping. Just as read through these posting I do remember a time as an adolesent; my dad and I were either hunting or cutting wood high in the Cascade Mountains. we were looking down into a huge clear cut section of a valley. The bottom looked like a 800 meters aways easy. From the general lay of the land I knew they were no roads at the bottom of this valley. We looked a long time, and listened to the loudest racket, of banging noises at the bottom of this clear cut, like something hollow hitting a log. I asked dad, and he did not say much either way. I just remember thinking i would not want to see what was making that noise.

But it is hard to believe a large animal like that has not been discovered. For what it is worth there is my one story

  
supertac45
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 21:22:39 SunApr 8 2007 )

I'm not sure if this creature exist or not; but, a few years back, I was in a remote area of the U.S. lower 48, and to this day i honestly don't know if I dreamed the whole thing or not. I don't use drugs and I wasn't packing any booze so that can be discounted. It was in September and the weather was nice,so I slept on the ground on my sleeping pad with my bag loose over me. In the middle of the night I awoke to some noise. Something big was moving in the brush nearby and I could smell it. It was different. The next morning I found footprints that weren't anything I ever saw before. For some reason, I went back over to my campsite, and went back to sleep. I awoke in the middle of the day and had the worst creepy feeling I ever felt. I packed up my gear and headed out without looking around anymore. To this day, I'm not sure if I just slept a whole bunch and had a weird dream or it happened.



---
supertac45
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wildland
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 06:39:11 ThuApr 12 2007 )

thank you for sharing

  
supertac45
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 23:21:55 ThuJun 28 2007 )

Just read that a research team is heading here to search for bigfoot in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

  
marten_catcher
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 20:55:09 WedJul 11 2007 )

we are not still talking about the furry man living in the woods are we???
just wondering cause it seems like alot of credible sightings all over.. LOL

  
Aleksei_Chirikov
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 18:32:33 MonAug 13 2007 )

FYI

In search of the Wild Man

Filed under Anchorage Press, Home Page - Highlighted Stories, News & Features, Feature Story, Archives, Vol. 16, Ed. 31 on Thursday, August 02, 2007 by Author: Press Staff.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


By Bill Sherwonit


“I was never afraid of anything,” Sam Stepanoff recalls, “not even in the dark.”

An Aleut resident of Perryville and, later, Chignik Lake (villages on the lower Alaska Peninsula), Stepanoff learned wilderness survival skills from village elders at a young age and felt no anxiety about camping alone, even as a boy.

But once, at age 14, he lost his usual cool.

Out harvesting sea urchins with friends one night, Stepanoff heard a dog barking in the nearby mountains. Recognizing it as his dog that had run off four days earlier, he followed the howls into the hills and tracked it down. As he stooped to pick up the dog, “the alders made some noise right beside me, and I saw a person. I thought it was the boys; we used to play around, scare each other. I said, ‘Knock it off, I know who you are.’ But it didn’t move, so I shined a flashlight and it was a man, his face just pure wrinkles. I said, ‘Who are you?’ but got no answer. He’s just looking at me, not speaking. I got so scared I dropped my dog and went down the cliff. I ran to where [the others] were gathering wood for a bonfire, and told them what I’d seen, and they took off running, too.”

Back in Perryville, Stepanoff shared his story with the village elders, who searched the hill but found nothing, not even tracks. The elders told him other “hairy guys” had been seen in the hills; occasionally they’d come into the village and rob fish from smokehouses.


Over the years, my imagination has been stirred by periodic reports of giant, shaggy primates roaming the forests of North America. Like many people, I’ve wondered: are they physically real? Invented? Imagined?

A middle-aged reading of Robert Bly’s Iron John — a book that introduces readers to the “Wild Man,” a mythical Indo-European being — led me back into ancient, shadowed forests and sent me on my own search for the archetypal figure. Until then, I’d never linked the two creatures. Now I can’t help wondering how Western culture’s repression of its own Wild Man relates to Americans’ schizophrenic fascination with that hairy anthropoid variously known as Bigfoot or Sasquatch.

It turns out I’m not alone in my curiosity. Among the dozens of books written about Sasquatch and his hirsute contemporaries is Robert Michael Pyle’s Where Bigfoot Walks: Crossing the Dark Divide. Pyle’s book stands apart from most other works of the genre by considering the creature’s mythical roots.

Only a few pages into his narrative, Pyle reflects, “Certain social anthropologists like to consign Bigfoot to the category of archetypal myth . . . But is there more to it than that? Looking at the traditions of Northwest Coast Indians, we see through the moss and the mist a furry figure who fits that deep myth of the monster-beyond-the-fire-circle, while clutching about itself a coarse-haired cloak of reality.”

Pyle then tells us about the Kwakiutl tribe of Washington and British Columbia, whose world includes Bukwus, the Wild Man of the woods, and Dzonoqua, the Wild Woman. Roaming the forest’s deep shadows, they are local, indigenous manifestations of Sasquatch, with one critical difference. The Kwakiutl accept these wild folk the same way they accept frogs, spruce trees, bears, and salmon: as part of their literal, physical world.

The Kwakiutl tribe is just one among many Native American groups who include wild people in their world.

Here in Alaska, Interior-dwelling Athabascans share the boreal forest with the Nuhu’anh, literally, “the sneaker,” but nowadays more commonly called the Woodsman. And throughout the state’s southern regions, residents tell stories of creatures who, by most accounts, are dark-haired, larger than people, reclusive, solitary, nocturnal, and a forest- or mountain-dweller. Almost always, these beings are “Hairy Men,” not women. Sometimes gentle, other times menacing, they never seem to speak, but they may scream, whistle, or imitate animal sounds. To many southwestern Eskimos, this being is Urayuli. To Lake Iliamna’s Athabascans, he is Get’gun, to Southeastern Tlingits, Kushtaka, to Bristol Bay’s Yup’iks, A-hoo-la-luk, and to the Alutiiq he is A’ula’ats or A’ula’aqs

Of all those Alaskan beings, I’m most familiar with the Hairy Man, whom I met, second-hand, in the early nineties.


I began hearing stories about the Hairy Man in 1993, while working on a project for the tribally run Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation. My job required that I talk with many of the region’s Native leaders and elders. Besides sharing their memories of traditional healing practices, the influence of Christian missionaries, and introduced diseases that killed thousands of Native residents, a few storytellers shared tales of huge, hairy, human-like creatures. I began collecting their stories in notebooks and on audiotapes and, over time, compiled an impressive record of encounters.

Ted Angasan’s stories immediately come to mind. A westerner listening to this Aleut’s quiet but earnest accounts might say that Angasan truly believes in Hairy Man. But that would be like saying that you or I believe in whales, or northern lights, or Jupiter. In the same way that Bukwus inhabits the Kwakiutl’s homeland and the Woodsman roams the Koyukon landscape, the Hairy Man is as much a part of Angasan’s world as bears, birds, and trees. He requires no proof and offers none. But he has stories to tell that speak of the creature’s existence.

In the late 1950s, Angasan told me, one of his teenage pals reported seeing a hairy, humanlike creature near the village of South Naknek. The friend, named Peter, had surprised the animal as it lay on some 55-gallon fuel drums. Panicked and alone, Peter grabbed his gun, shot — and missed. The creature, in turn, screamed loudly, and then took off running.

Peter ran, too, and didn’t stop until he reached the village, where he told of his meeting with Hairy Man. Most people remained skeptical. “They thought he’d seen everything but a Hairy Man,” Angasan recalled. “But I believed. You can tell when a guy is lying or not. He was scared to death.” Angasan then paused a moment, as if sorting through memories, before adding, “I know the story is true, because I’ve seen it too.”

Angasan saw Hairy Man in 1985, while on a commercial flight from Kululak Bay to Dillingham, the region’s largest town. Passing over forested mountains near the village of Manokotak, he noticed an unusual form below: “There was this giant thing sitting in the trees. He looked like, not quite a gorilla, but dark and full of hair. I’d say, from the trees around him, he was between seven and 10 feet tall.”

When I suggested the creature might have been a bear, Angasan shook his head and replied, “Uh-uh. I’m color blind, so I look for shapes. I could see his eyes and his head, his whole body. He was looking at us, watching us fly by; he didn’t seem bothered at all. But he was a Hairy Man, all right.”

Besides the stories themselves, what stands out in my memory is that Angasan told them in a dispassionate, matter-of-fact manner. There was no attempt to convince me or sensationalize the experience. If anything, he seemed reluctant to say any more than necessary. Yet the fact that they are his stories makes them all the more believable, because this soft-spoken man is a respected leader within his community. Among other things, he has served as the Bristol Bay Native Corporation’s executive director and represented the region on Alaska’s Inter-Tribal Council. From a western perspective he’s articulate, politically savvy, sharp. In both worlds, Native and Western, he’s a credible witness.

Then there’s John Gumlickpuk, a Yup’ik elder who once encountered a Hairy Man near Togiak, where he was born in 1906. Then in his early 30s, he went outside at sunrise and met a man covered with long hair. “He was as big as us, but hairy all over,” Gumlickpuk recounted. “The only place he didn’t have hair was his face.”

Startled by Gumlickpuk, the man quickly ran away. Speedy exits are characteristic of many Bristol Bay Hairy Men, which by most accounts can run incredibly fast. They can also jump high and far, sometimes over rivers or trees. John Gumlickpuk’s wife, Elena, tells of a Hairy Man who was spotted by a woman washing clothes. When confronted, she says, “he jump off, way far. He could jump over high bushes and really run fast.”

Stepanoff, Angasan, and the Gumlickpuks are among the many people throughout Alaska — mostly Native and mostly rural — who acknowledge the existence of a large, hair-covered, two-footed creature that is human or apelike in nature.


Scientists and other researchers have so far shown less interest in Alaska’s hairy bipeds than in Sasquatch or Yeti. Of the half-dozen Sasquatch/Bigfoot books at Anchorage’s public library — books aimed at a general audience — I could find none that mentioned Hairy Man. From an academic perspective, the anthropologists who’ve documented Alaska Hairy Men stories have tended to treat them as Native mythical beings, rather than real creatures; not surprising, given their scientific bias. One notable exception to that rule is Anchorage resident Patricia Partnow, who studied the Alutiiq people of Southwest for her dissertation with the University of Alaska Fairbanks. In one section of her work, Partnow describes a group of outsiders known to the Alutiiq as A’ula’ats or A’ula’aqs, while avoiding judgments about their reality.

“A’ula’aqs are not human,” she observes, “though it is possible for them to be mistaken for people and for people who go to live with them to take on their characteristics.” Strong and hairy, they are dangerous beings who lure people away from human society. Much like Dracula, they can be warded off with crosses or holy water, but “the best strategy with A’ula’aqs,” writes Partnow, “is to avoid them altogether.”

Not all Natives believe A’ula’aqs to be supernatural or “other than human.” Several Southwestern residents interviewed by both Partnow and me believe such creatures to be runaways, ranging from members of their own tribes to AWOL servicemen and “hippies” who’ve “gone wild.” But nearly all are similar in these respects: they are not normal; and they usually pose some sort of danger associated with what Partnow calls “an irresistible power which can only be countered by quick minds and feet and powerful religious (i.e., Russian Orthodox) beliefs.”

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has not undertaken a Hairy Man study, says Jim Fall, an anthropologist with the state’s Subsistence Division. And yet he’s often heard Dena’ina Athabascans — some of whom live in and around Anchorage — speak of Nant’inas: large, shaggy creatures that “are fairly malevolent and dangerous. One of the themes is that they [like the Woodsman] steal children and raise them in the wild.” From a Western perspective, Fall adds, “One could speculate that the origins of these stories might come from outcasts or social misfits not subject to traditional norms, and therefore dangerous.”

“The thing you have to remember about Native beliefs,” he says, “is that boundaries between humans and other creatures are often blurred. There’s no question that Nant’ina is part of Dena’ina reality.”

The parallels are striking. From arctic boreal woodlands to Washington’s old-growth forest, and as far south as California, the wild people of Native lore are as real as any creature that inhabits the landscape.

But they’re also mysterious beings that move through the shadows, only rarely showing themselves. They also may possess superhuman, or supernatural, abilities. Though no one knows their origins for sure, each region has legends that suggest these wild folk are social outcasts or misfits, people who left the human world for a more primitive or even animal-like existence. And while many stories describe them as tricksters or even malicious beings who sometimes steal children, these wild men and women usually seem more shy than dangerous. In all of these aspects of the Wild Man, what seems important are the human ties and supernatural elements, which harken back to Western stories from the Middle Ages and more ancient times.

Few cultures, past or present, have lacked a human-faced hairy monster, giant, or wild man in one form or another, whether myth or “real.” Such shadowy creatures lurk, mostly hidden, across the planet, including in Western societies — a reminder of the wildness concealed within everything, even “civilized” human beings. The best known outside the Pacific Northwest is the Himalayan Yeti, or abominable snowman. But the residents of southwest Russia’s Caucasus Mountains tell stories of another hairy man, named Quidili; and reports of strange hairy primates have also come from western China. Still other hairy monsters inhabit islands, deserts, and even the tropics. In his book, Pyle lists several: the Cigouave, a Haitian forest beast tied to voodoo; the South Pacific’s Oreng-Pendek of Borneo and Sumutra; Malaysia’s Orang-Dalam; and East Africa’s Agogue. “There are,” he adds, “swamp beasts galore, the Moth man, the Gray Man of the Carolinas, and a wide array of troglodytes.”

Because their experience of what’s “real” has remained much broader than that of Euro-Americans, our country’s indigenous peoples have left more room in their worlds for the likes of Bukwus, Hairy Man and their wild kin, even in this modern era. Even this may be changing, though, as older traditions and beliefs fade in a world where TVs, computers, and the Internet bring new realities and mysteries.


Given my background I naturally find the physical existence of such Hairy Men — and their acceptance by many Alaska Natives — to be incredible. Once upon a time, I would have said “unbelievable.” But now I’m not so sure. Surely the Hairy Man is no more amazing than some of what’s in the Bible. Or what scientists have discovered about the origins of the universe and life on our small, blue planet.

The older I get and the more I learn, the more room I leave for the mysterious, the fantastic and magical. I’m open to the possibility of Hairy Man and his kind, because I’ve come to realize there’s so much we don’t — indeed, can’t — know about this wide, wild world.

No culture, Pyle muses, “has ever been so confused as ours as to what it really believes. Are we such wonderful observers of the natural world that we should expect to know everything that looms, walks, creeps, or grows outside our doors or beyond the city wall?”

I like that gentle jab. I’m reminded how the simple act of bird feeding expanded my own small world, which suddenly exploded with songbirds and their melodious voices after 43 years of inattention. I’m reminded that I largely ignored the spring and summertime wonders of Anchorage’s coastal refuge for more than two decades. And I’m reminded that ecologists now believe we modern humans have discovered only a tiny fraction of the species with whom we share the Earth. Our greatest minds admit how little we understand the workings of our planet, despite the past century’s explosion of knowledge and technological advances. Wildness — like the Hairy Man, it seems — is capable of popping up anywhere.

Yet all too often we won’t take seriously what we can’t see or hold onto or measure: the invisibles of life. If we only value and protect that which we know and love, where does that leave the portions of creation that fall beyond the scope of our knowledge? Only by getting to know wild nature will we learn to embrace and cherish and preserve it, both within ourselves and as manifested in myriad other forms, in the larger, more-than-human world.

The good news is that wildness reaches everywhere, from the far wilderness to the innermost pockets of our biggest cities. We can each choose where, in what form, and in what way we get to know the wild. In touching the Wild Man, we learn to better love the world. And in loving the world, we embrace our own richly wild essence.



This story is adapted from a longer essay, which will appear in Bill Sherwonit’s book, Living with Wildness: An Alaskan Odyssey, to be published this winter by the University of Alaska Press.

Al

  
Thulefoth
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Re: A seemingly credible report ( 20:29:03 MonAug 13 2007 )

Yes, before the Western ways, many individuals of the Tribes would have found themselves unfitted to the only social options available to them. There would be those who were 'damaged goods', themselves, and there would have been others who were intact, but simply did not fit satisfactorily with the expectations of their day. Because there is a wider variety of niches in the larger modern societies, it may even have been that problems with 'personal adjustment' were a greater challenge then, than now.

When we look at the array of 'mangled' people who inhabit the margins of our Western society, today, it is not hard to imagine that in the former Tribal times, such misfits would have made their way into the removed & unmonitored places ... becoming more or less wild. It is possible that they would have formed their own sustaining cultures & communities.

I left home prematurely in late 1969 (being less than perfectly adapted..) and spent the winter hiding out in the flop-houses & dens of 1st Avenue Skidrow Seattle. The largest contingent among the alkies and crazies and yo-yos I lived with, were the Alaska Natives.

The hot talk with the Natives was, they might get a bunch of money. The honchos had found oil in Alaska, and to get it out they needed to make peace with the Native-claims. Eventually, the Seattle skidrow drunks became the main Shareholders in the 13th Native Corporation.

That quicly killed many of them. Others tried to pull out of their personal suicide-dives. My close friend Bob was headed home to the Interior for a new start. Hope you made it, Bob (Ted, "Jordan Allen").

But the germane thing is, I doubt this kind of problem originated with the White Man's Ways, and I doubt that it was limited to North American Natives. All the Euros once lived as Tribes Folk, too.

In 1969, about 10% of the Northern Natives were living as wild & hairy creatures in the mythical land of Skidrow. 'Hairy Men', indeed. In the olden days, the percentages may have been worse. We figure that better than 20% of America has 'fallen through the cracks', and live as low-intensity desperadoes. Today, 2007.

Yeah, there could have been plenty of Wild Men living in the forests & mountains of old .

  
gr8wtnorth
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 19:49:59 WedSep 26 2007 )

I'm not one to say yes or no when it comes to things not "verified". I've even caught a fish this summer that the biologists are having trouble figuring out. While hunting 70 miles up the Chitina River with Mark, Mike and Jim we came across something we couldn't figure out. Explain this one. We pulled up on a long beach with an oxebow in it when we spotted some fresh grizz tracks. Mark and Jim went around to the southwest of the beach until it came to cliffs right down to the water and cut into the alders and aspen which lead to the inside waterline of the oxebow. Mike and I went North along the beach, which was about 100 yards wide from the water to the alders and fairly level. When we were following the fresh grizz tracks we came across the following track that came out of the willows, went for about 20 yards and then returned to the willows. The track was about 6.5 to 7 inches long. There had been hard rain for three days prior to then and all the rest of the tracks were completely wiped out. These tracks must have been during the last rain as they were still very detailed. It was cold, down to freezing every night. No sign of ANY other human prescense. No tracks, boat landing or anything and although we circled the entire alder patch which was about a half mile around, no other tracks were seen. Who knows...maybe it was a "Baby bigfoot"...lol.






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Ace Callaway

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wilsonjr
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 17:20:02 TueOct 2 2007 )

Ace, that section of river is littered with barefoot rafters before hunting season. My guess is you've probably got evidence of UBR. Unidentified Barefoot Rafter.

  
seearby
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 23:19:48 FriOct 5 2007 )

I think the whole Bigfoot thing is a bunch of hooha. If it was real, there would be much more credible evidence of it's existence.

  
Thulefoth
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 00:28:47 SatOct 6 2007 )

Speaking of hooha, seearby, did ya hear the one about President Truman?

Harry was a plain-speaker, not unlike yourself...

One day the President's lovely daughter beseeches her mother, "Mother! You really must teach father not to say manure!" [We believe the pronunciation was something like 'mun-yeeeer'.]

"No!", reply the matron emphatically. "You teach him. It took me 20 years to teach him to call it manure!"



  
seearby
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 11:45:32 SatOct 6 2007 )

Yep Thule, from what I've read, old Harry was pretty set in his ways. Most politicians today are only worried about getting reelected.
Anyway, I suppose I should have said the Bigfoot thing is a bunch of manure...huh

  
Thulefoth
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 13:29:54 SatOct 6 2007 )

Well, whatever word you use, seearby, I think you hit the nail on the head with respect to Bigfoot, and that you also did the Board and community a favor, pointing straight to where the bear obviously went through the bushes.

"wildland" started this thread - and it has been a very prolific one for the Board, and plainly enjoyed by the members. But. ...

wildland didn't want to just put the Bigfoot-topic out on the table and let folks go at it. He wanted to restrict how it would be handled. He said: "Personally I have seen tracks only but please ask to be serious when posting back,about sightings or tracks whoops or whistles."

So ... I can talk about Bigfoot, but only if I'm "serious" (meaning I accept?) and I should only post "about sightings or tracks whoops or whistles".

That's a rigged game. I don't aim to slam wildland, and I don't really think he set out to 'play games' with us, but the fact is he did 'set conditions' on how the Bigfoot-topic should be handle, and those conditions do skew & limit how a normal person is going to respond to the Bigfoot topic.

We have all watched with great interest the discovery of the amazing Hobbit mini-human in Indonesian. This is a real stunner. It also implies things about the possibility of other "totally unknown" human ancestors & relatives.

However, the Bigfoot topic is a lot like UFOs, in that we know full well that whether or not any valid evidence of UFOs or Bigfoot exists is buried under great heaps & mounds of hooha, BS, and ma-nyeer.

To pretend like Bigfoot isn't somewhere between 99 and 100% hooha is just plain ... pretending. To ask us to overlook that truth before chiming-in ain't the way it should be set up.

How 'bout it, wildland?

  
seearby
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 14:54:33 SatOct 6 2007 )

So, (seriously speaking of course) maybe, just maybe, Wildland "IS", himself, BIGFOOT.

  
Thulefoth
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 20:25:13 SatOct 6 2007 )

If I read you right, seerby ... yes, Wildland - and many of us - could conceivably be Bigfoot. And if so, it probably won't remain an 'out there' question for long.

Even before genetics started swinging its weight around, it was popular to claim descent from Neanderthals. Today, there is quite a rough-n-tumble going on among top professional scientists, whether the European group - or other human branches - did or didn't derive partially or even wholly from Neanderthals.

This sort of question-posing also applies to other lines of descent and relatedness. The Hobbit-folk, for instance, ended up on Flores Island. That was the end of a million year or more adventure for them. ... So, did they spend all that time doing crossword puzzles ... and taking cold showers? Probably not. They shared the stage with other groups of humans for 100s of thousands of years. Some of those other groups became groups of present-day humans.

Obviously, the popular idea of Bigfoot paints it pretty far off to one side of humans ... but if Bigfoot ever did exist, it was all but certainly a ("just another") human-variety ... and as such, knowing the propensity of the human critter, could still be alive today ... paying taxes & playing on the Internet. :smile:

  
Thulefoth
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 21:02:57 SatOct 6 2007 )

Hey, Ace, I saw your post earlier about the strange tracks up on the Chitina River ... but as is my common practice, I had images turned off in the browser, and did not see the picture you sent with the post.

Today I turned on images ... and ya know, that Chitina-report is starting to make more sense to me now.

  
gr8wtnorth
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 19:06:29 SatOct 13 2007 )

Only problem with DeanJr's idea is it is after ALL the McCarthy tours are shut down, There were no tracks from or close to the water and it was after four days of rain and it had been freezing every night. All other tracks as far as wildlife were washed away totally. Only these, that had been rained on but were made recently, and other fresh wildlife tracks from that day or the day before. Like I said, the tracks came out of thick willows and went back into thick willows. Not a real place you would think a "barefoot rafter" would be coming from or going to. I'm not saying it is a "little foot"....just strange.



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Ace Callaway

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wilsonjr
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 14:50:43 MonOct 15 2007 )

Did Mark have his shoes on?

  
gr8wtnorth
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 22:57:11 MonOct 22 2007 )

Too funny....Mark is always cold...you know that. He has to take a heater when walking around...lol.
Ace



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wildland
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 10:11:01 SunJan 6 2008 )

I see while I was gone the manure was being thrown..No Im not bigfoot,,,and I did put stipulations on this thread because I really wanted ifo not really views. I wanted facts first hand or sencond,,but turn this thread into a debate. Debating how a Marten should be trapped is one thing. I wanted to gather from a outdoors group not rumors in a bar..ie people of the deer by Mowat...so now i ts 2008,,round two?

  
prairiegrouse
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 11:11:50 SunJan 6 2008 )

I am still searching the remote outposts of Alaska and have yet to encounter bigfoot. Never saw evidence never saw sign, never met anyone who face to face that was sober ever claimed to have seen anything.... however being in the villages many folks claim to see the little people...you know the Inuiks or the EMenoraks. These are myth and legend and very old tradition..... kind of like Santa Claus, the Easter bunny.

I have seen numerous live and running wolverine. If there was a bigfoot anywhere near where I was, I should have seen him or observed sign... I spend enough time out there that since I havent seen him..... maybe I am BF repellent.

Maybe I could provide a service to the paranoid, the schizophrenic the mentally unstable that are in need of BF repellent.

I could come stand by their side for say $80 dollars and hour and keep them safe from all the bigfoots that tread through the muddy soiled fecal matter in their skulls.

Now if Big foot shows up and my repellent doesnt work, all fees will be joyfully refunded.


  
wildland
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Re: this is not a joke, bigfoot? ( 10:00:38 FriJan 11 2008 )

Id contact a good lawyer to write up that contract first. If you ever hear of such stories of BF plz share here or pm me please thanks.

  

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