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jmaxwell
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Retirement ( 04:47:01 ThuDec 27 2007 )

I will be moving to Happy Camp to live in a few months. I know about what to exspect as far as river prospecting, but could enyone tell me if there will be eny promising metal detecting. Also is the weather such that I could detect in the winter.

  
Jim_Alaska
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Re: Retirement ( 05:06:37 ThuDec 27 2007 )

The weather should not keep you from detecting. It gets cold at night, but usually warms up to 40 degrees or so in the day at the coldest time of year. But then again, you are getting this information from an Alaskan...hah!

It is my personal opinion that nugget shooting here has been sadly neglected. There were a few people here years ago that did well at it, but they are long gone.

For what it is worth, there are lots of leftover tailing piles from the old days and everyone knows how inefficient those old sluic boxes were. There are also a lot of old hydraulic mines around that should be good nugget shooting.



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Jim_Alaska
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pascalfortier
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Re: Retirement ( 07:36:35 ThuDec 27 2007 )

My best advice will definetly be to go on the other side of the river. I do not know how is the river rigth now. But Everyone go on the easy side, few venture on the other river side.

Funny moment I once was directly in face of a big rock fall at the salmon claims in a forest area. I heard the rocks fallings and the trees breaking. First tought was Run Forest Run!!!! Take long boots in the summer and walking across a river without a kayak is a bad idea!

I suggest if you go metal detecting take a medic air it cost what 25 $ a year and have a great peace of mind.

  
UncleMark
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Re: Retirement ( 20:43:16 ThuDec 27 2007 )

Jim is right in mentioning that there are many old mines in the Klamath area. Do some research on the old hydraulic mines and their locations, then make sure they are not under a valid claim. I have located many old hydraulic workings on club claims. The only person I knew who did a lot of metal detecting has not been around since the early 90's, but he use to find some nice nuggets. My choice was always dredging as I found much more gold this way.
Just remember that the Klamath forest has overgrown most of these areas and they are hard to find, at least the ones that have not seen recent activity.
Mark

  
jmaxwell
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Re: Retirement ( 23:15:13 ThuDec 27 2007 )

Thansks Jim & Uncle Mark, I am reserching the mines in that area. I have found about 30 mine so far.I will also be highbanking. That should keep me busyfar a while.

  
LipCa
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Re: Retirement ( 23:21:28 ThuDec 27 2007 )

Happy Camp is really wet during the winter so waterproofing your detector and yourself is necessary.

  
micropedes1
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Re: Retirement ( 05:08:10 FriDec 28 2007 )

Those old hydraulic mines are probably the source for many of the newer paystreaks found lately. The question that I'm wondering about is just how far downstream from the tailing piles a streak might extend?

Any of y'all with more intimate knowledge of the local river's seasonal flows wanna discuss this?

  
UncleMark
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Re: Retirement ( 19:24:14 FriDec 28 2007 )

G,
The first gold paystreak I worked on the Klamath was a streak from the runoff of an old hydraulic mine's sluice. The streak ran downstream for over a half a mile from the original location of the sluice, and most of the gold was very fine and in the top two feet of material(the top layer of material). There was a set of rapids that I worked down into and I could not find the same deposit below those rapids.
My take on it was that the gold gets scattered all around the original discharge area, but tends to follow regular paystreak formations after the first set of rapids.
Mark

  
jmaxwell
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Re: Retirement ( 02:41:03 SatDec 29 2007 )

How far from the banks of the river does the claims cover, that is roughly.

  
micropedes1
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Re: Retirement ( 02:52:06 SatDec 29 2007 )

If they are like mine, it varies from claim to claim. That's what you get when you use the PLS system to define claim boundaries. Generally, if you can hit the water with a rock, you're OK. But if you get to looking up on the hillsides, you might want to do a bit more research.

Most of us are really agreeable...as long as you ask first.

  
Jim_Alaska
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Re: Retirement ( 03:24:05 SatDec 29 2007 )

If you look at the claim maps on the goldgold website, you can see rough claim boundaries. They are outlined in red.



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Jim_Alaska
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