pulling on lead
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jacquie
17:46:28 Sun
May 18 2003
pulling on lead
I saw a few people talking about the problem. I got a great bit of advice from a "boxer lady" when I had a rescue dog. He was "huge" and a nightmare to walk I had to wrap his lead round my waistin order to have some form of controll!I am only 5ft. It was quite a site.
What you do is when the dog starts to pull make him sit. You have to say it with conviction. Then when you are ready to go again tell your dog to walk on. Continue this process each time your dog pulls. It will add ages to your walk, but your dog will eventually get fed up as walks on the lead are no longer fun and learn you are infact in controll NOT him. It took me about 3 months with a very stuborn 18 month boy but it did work.

NickiG
03:51:25 Mon
May 19 2003
Re: pulling on lead
Good advice, thank you. I may try that a bit. Unfortunetly I have very little patience LOL
I like the instand solutions:roundnround: I have found the Gentle leader is an instant cure once you get passed the "freak out" they do when you first put it on themLOL
I now use a harness which was pretty quick results too.
I may play around abit with what you have suggested too, even though they walk usually just fine on their harnesses.

Guest [Unregistered]
04:29:43 Sun
Jun 8 2003
Re: pulling on lead
First, use a "pinch collar," which has blunt spikes facing inward toward the dog. Dogs with lots of loose folds are not influenced by ordinary "choke collars," let alone just a plain old dog collar. Usually a really firm jerk (not a continuous pull) will get the animal's attention. I was concerned that it would hurt the dog, but it really doesn't. The second option is an electronic training collar. These aren't cheap ($60-100 US), but they always work. The collar has a receiver and a "shocker" powered by a watch battery. You carry a remote. Generally, there are five or more shock settings, and the shock is accompanied by a high pitched sound. There are often three buttons, one for shock+sound, one for sound only, and one to adjust the shock level. The devices come for small, medium, or large dogs. When the dog pulls, give him a jolt! Again, it gets the dog's attention, but it doesn't hurt even enough to get a yelp. Finally, there are electronic collars that "shock" when there is tension on the leash. Theser are much less expensive than the electronic remote training collar, but they are only good for pulling problems. The more expensive model can be used to teach other commands. The most important tip is to first "dummy" the collar by training the dog to wear it comfortably for a couple of weeks. Let the animal wear it around, familiarize him with the remote (without batteries) by giving him rewards when you put the collar on and point the remote at him. That way he won't associate the device with the shock during real training. The electronic devices are almost "instant solutions," and eventually the animal will realize that if he doesn't pull he won't get shocked.

Guest [Unregistered]
10:21:57 Sun
Jun 8 2003
Re: pulling on lead
Hi

This is pearlp (having problems logging in)

As regards to the suggestion above you must be joking.

I use a Halti on Bella when we are on the roads or places where she must be under total control.

When we are somewhere with no distractions, I take the Halti off and use the method as discribed by Jacquie, yes it takes alot of time, progress is slow, but i`d rather do it that way than frighten the life out of her.
And yes she is improving slowley

jacquie
08:27:25 Tue
Jun 10 2003
Re: pulling on lead
spacedoc, I was horrified to read your answer to pulling!!!! Have you tryed this method on yourself ie wearing the coller and letting someone shock you?:smash6: I am so glad there are people out there that use love and understanding rather than shock tactics:shocked: I hate to think you have subjected some loving and loyal companion to this.:smash6:

Boxerann
13:04:44 Tue
Jun 10 2003
Re: pulling on lead
I have to admit that I didn't expect to see that sort of advice given on this board and I just can't believe that anyone would use these sort of contraptions. In my opinion if you have to resort to such tactics you shouldn't have a dog in the first place.
Ann

Guest [Unregistered]
17:09:57 Sun
Jun 27 2004
Re: pulling on lead
First of all, I have recently used the sound/shock collar, after spending thousands on behaviorist, at home training, etc. for an abused rescue.
I am shocked to see people in here upset about using this method.
Until you have a dog with severe problems, please do not judge the method of which is used.
The vet wants to put him on medication, he approved the collar short term first, then we will be forced to use medication. Just to name a few problems:
Aggresstion
Excessive Barking Due to Separation Anxiety
Excessive barking when anyone comes to house, including us.
Hyper
will not come when called
rescue - over a yr old, got him at 4 months
bassett/golden lab mix
stubborn
Extreme Separation Anxiety
jealous of everything.
I have worked with him extensively..... too much money spent for no results.
Please do not tell me to use treats/clicker I have done it all.
The sound collar is the only thing that has worked thus far, still in the beginning stages. But I will use the shock
if need be.
Now do any of you that are so against this have any better ideas?
Brook


Guest [Unregistered]
17:12:15 Sun
Jun 27 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
I love my dogs just like the rest of you. I have raised dogs/breed them etc. I have trained them.
Cooper is an exception to the rule.

So to say we shouldn't have pets is uncalled for.

jacquie
10:13:53 Mon
Jun 28 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
Brook_Shire

Time, tenderness, patience, more time, more patience. Praise, loving and more time. Yes I have had a dog as you described it also was a rescue. The only way round it is I have said. There are NO quick fixes.
As for the Seperation Anxiety. We would leave the house for 5 mins and it would be trashed. Move all breakable objects. Buckets plants ect. Dont lock the dog in a room. Leave the house for 2 mins come back. Leave for 5 mins come back slowley add it up to a longer time. As I have said and will keep saying it takes time and patience.
I'm sure I speek for all here we will help you all we can from experiance and sugestions. I would never resort to hurting an animal inorder to make it do as you wish.

jacquie
10:22:48 Mon
Jun 28 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
Brook_Shire

Just a thought break it down. What do you have the most problem with. Take it a stage at a time. Trying to do too much at once can be soul destroying and too much for your four legged friend!
Let us know I'm sure you can work through it. It does get better!!!

Guest [Unregistered]
10:02:17 Wed
Jun 30 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
I have called yet another behavorist, and she says he needs very special treatment, and medication may be the only way to go. We cannot spend 1000 more just to see he will not respond to what any of us are doing for him. Over a year with no results, time to look at other alternatives, no we will not give him away, two families already did that, we are the third owners. We will try medication and if that does not work.. Then we will just live with a psyco dog and deal with it. The bottom line is we love him.. where no one else did. No I do not want to inflict pain on any one or any animal, never have, never will, however, if a bit of a shock (small amount) will work I am willing to try it, everything else has failed. And if I ever did use the shock I would use the lowest possible setting first, and just so you all know, I used it on me and my husband first to see what it felt like.
Thanks for your advice, it is greatly appreciated. Oh and the electric fence,,, he goes right thru it. Doesn't phase him.

jacquie
14:21:32 Wed
Jun 30 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
So what is his worst point?
To be honest I dont totally agree with paying for somone to tell me whats wrong with an animal unless it's a vet. LOl
You normally find out by watching what's going on.
Does he freek at anything in particular? Does something trigger his "moments"? It could be noise,darkness,even a program tune?
Please tell us more. I'm sure we can help.

Just a thought instead of going for medication have you tryed Bachs Rescue? I have used this before on Boxers and other dogs! Give it a try you may even be pleased with the results!! It takes a few days to get into the system and you can get it at most chemists.
What are you feeding him? Are there any additives that could be effecting him?
Try James Wellbeloved. It's kibble it has no additives and is kind to tummy's.
Please give a bit more info.
Jacquie

Guest [Unregistered]
10:04:09 Fri
Jul 2 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
Hey Again,

Here is my email addy.... email me, so I can email you what the on going problems are.
You mention Bachs, I live in the US, never heard of that, but will research it further.
My vet is the one that recommended a specialist aka Behavoirist for our loving sweet 'unruly' , precious pup. lol.
Then he said a low dose of doggy valium, need to get the name of the medication he suggested for aniexty.

Cooper is like a child with severe ADD, Hyperactive. this is what the vet equated him too. I told him I really dont want to put him on antidepressents, but I would consider a short term low dose, anti aniexty pill. (for me LOL jk).
my email.

brook_shire@yahoo.com
:spinsmile:

Again thank you so much!!! And FYI.... I used the shock part on him,,,, I will never do that again.... I did not like the way it affected him. He is too loveing to do that to him. And way to sensitive in terms of getting his feelings hurt.

jacquie
11:14:16 Sat
Jul 3 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
Ive e mailed you:spinsmile:

Snow_King
12:17:50 Mon
Jul 12 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
Hi Brook_shire
I Just Wanted to let you know that there is HOPE!

My Whiteboy Jake (AKA Snow King) is in his 3rd home with us. We have had him for just over two years now.

Jake is loving and Gentle - Until he meets other dogs!!!:shocked:
We struggled on trying all sorts of techniques to cope with him, and eventually heard about a specialist trainer who specialises with 'problem' dogs (Aggressive and submissive). People travel up to 3 hours every week to go to her classes. They cost just 5 for 2 hours and involve working in close proximity with about 4 other dogs per session.
We have been attending classes for 10 months now and love every minute of them. They are mainly clicker based, but are a lot more involved than simple 'clicker training'
It has taken time, hard work and perseverance, but it is worth every penny.
I now have a lovely, happy dog who loves going to training (He has just learn't to skateboard!!!):lol:

Different things work for different dogs, but don't give up - It does get better:jump:

PS. Glad you are not using 'Shock tactics'- There are kinder, more effective ways.





jacquie
08:39:07 Tue
Jul 13 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
Hi Snow King

That's uplifting!! Glad things are working out for you:smile:
I have always found that "problem" dogs have come from problem owners! As you say there is no quick fix but I think Love, understanding and patience does pay off in the end.
There really is light at the end of the tunnel

Snow_King
12:35:21 Tue
Jul 13 2004
Re: pulling on lead afterthought
It's the ignorant ones (owners) that are the worst - son't you think?!!!!:smash6:

SashasMum
11:02:33 Wed
Jul 14 2004
Re: pulling on lead
Sasha too was a "problem" dog when I got her - that was the reason her previous owners had gotten rid of her! I wish they could see their "problem dog" now though! After 5 months of tlc and lots of understanding, patience and the right food, she is a very well behaved dog! Ok she eats the soap, candles, apples and just about any barbie shoe left in her wake............ but she comes when she is called, walks to heal, and generally does as she is told!

I agree with the problem owner theory 100%!

Some people get a boxer and just dont understand them - they are such a special breed. I love the fact that they are just so devoted to you, although the flip side of that is the seperation anxiety! We take Sasha most places and try never to leave her for more than an hour if possible. She now knows we are coming back so hasnt chewed the house up to punish us!

Reading the bit about shock therapies - the trainer I used showed me a collar that sprayed citronella when they barked/jumped up etc, but I felt even that was too cruel! My ultimate weapon is a plastic bottle filled with gravel that gets shaken if she is doing something naughty like drinking from the canal or digging my garden! It works a treat and I havent had to shout at her for 3 months now!

Who says boxers are untrainable!
Karen :smile:



pulling on lead
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