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Bugzda
08:05:24 Sat
Apr 9 2005

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Dreamer

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Installing coolant system lines.

I am getting ready to install the coolant system lines in a 1974 standard beetle, for the 12a rotary engine transplant.

I was thinking of running the lines in the heater channels of the bug.

I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions, tips, tricks, for accomplishing this. It seems like it would be a pain to run ridgid pipe in the channels because of the bends in the channel near the front of the car, right below the door hinge area?

Has anyone used a flexible pipe? Or found a way to make the bend without cutting into the heater channels to install a pre formed angle fitting?

Running the lines in the heater channels seems to be the prefered method, but I have not been able to find anyone who has accomplished this.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank You.
Rich
jabber@jabberwock.us


  
subaruboxer
10:27:57 Sat
Aug 6 2005

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Re: Installing coolant system lines.

Hi Rich,

don't put your coolant lines into the heater channels or the tunnel! Put them under the car, alongside the tunnel left and right. Use metal tubes, to take advantage of the coolant loosing some heat on it's way to the radiator. You can use a smaller radiator, and will not have the feeling that your heater is on all the time. If you run the coolant lines inside the tunnel or the heater channel you will have corrosion due to condensation.

  
ambrosia
20:03:00 Wed
Nov 9 2005

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Re: Installing coolant system lines.

On my wbx conversion I used stainless steel ribbed flexible pipes.

Three advantages.

1) Flexible. It's dead easy to route.
2) Cooling. Because it's ribbed and running under the car you get loads of cooling both to and from the rad.
3) Stainless steel. Won't rust, leak or brake.

I just used U shaped clamps with rubber bushes bolted along the floorpan so that it didn't vibrate around.

The only problem I had was securing water tight rubber pipes to each end.

I plan to use them again for my subaru project as they were so practical.

  
BlindedbyScience
18:39:30 Sat
Dec 24 2005

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Re: Installing coolant system lines.

I'm going to use 1.5-inch diameter Type "L" flexible copper tubing. About $7.50 a linear foot from the local plumbing supply. I may flatten it oval for a lower profile. This stuff is very easy to work (and repair) and connectors are easy to come by.

  
eureka
01:29:08 Wed
Jan 11 2006

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Almost Serious

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Re: Installing coolant system lines.

Quote: ambrosia at 20:03:00 Wed Nov 9 2005



The only problem I had was securing water tight rubber pipes to each end.


You could try the old trick of drilling a 2 small holes 180 degrees apart in the end of the pipe and fitting pop rivets. This gives the hose clamped rubber pipe something to grip and prevents it blowing off under pressure.

  
zenjoe
15:38:57 Mon
Jan 30 2006

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Re: Installing coolant system lines.

copper pipe is better for cooling pipe than stainless. although stainless is good for corrosion resistance, it is horrible at heat transfer, plus it is really expensive. copper has excellent corrosion resistance, you can solder it and it dissipates heat really well.



---
For more information on stuffing a Mazda Rotary engine in a Bug, go to my website at http://www.geocities.com/zenjoe/vw.html
 
 
Hemitheus
16:52:08 Fri
Feb 3 2006

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Re: Installing coolant system lines.

The problem with copper it it is HORRIBLY ugly. I helped my friend put a Stealth twin turbo in the back of his bus (and it was an evil little bus) We used copper and ended up soldering ribs into it as well to better dissipate heat, so this thing was horrendous looking. What we did to make it look less like the underside of a mobile home was we cleaned it up and shot it with a coat of silver hi-temp engine paint. It really make it look a whole lot better if asthetics is an issue for you. It does trap in heat a little more but it isnt anything substantial so long as you dont put 40 coats of paint on.

(wish i had pics of the stealth-van to show you guys. Sadly we didnt have a digi-cam back then and the van is now in hell as it was rearended at a relatively high speed about 2 years ago)



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http://members.cox.net/hemitheus
 
 

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