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geowizard
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Ophir 2017 ( 15:30:36 WedAug 16 2017 )

Hello Everyone,

Working every season at the effort to produce GOLD at a real GOLD mine offers an abundance of challenges - also known as opportunities!

For those of you, "interested prospectors", I would like to share my experience of placer mining and prospecting for GOLD at Ophir, Alaska.

My original ambition was to organize a GOLD mining campaign in one of the few remaining politically stable regions in the world; Alaska. It has been an interesting and at times difficult journey.

I looked at the options of mining Districts in Alaska and after a brief attempt at beach mining at Nome, in 2009, I decided to move to an "interior" mining district. Since 2010, I have operated a placer GOLD mine at Ophir.

There are many important subject areas that surround the central mission of placer mining in a remote part of Alaska. I have brought a few of those subjects into discussion here on this forum in the past. My objective at Ophir was (and still is) to develop a commercial GOLD mine The process by definition involves consideration of all of the cost factors that come into play.

It's a business;

Anyone that dreams of GOLD mining in a "for profit" enterprise quickly finds out that there are unexpected costs. Managing the risk of operating a mine in order to reduce the cost of operation becomes foremost in your mind. Television and the related drama works great for selling commercials. It serves only to slow down production and add to the cost in a real mining operation.

Mining at Ophir has included processing dragline tailings. The amount of GOLD remaining in dragline tailings can be profitable if the volume of production and cost of operating are managed. The variable that comes into play is the value of gold per cubic yard can go up and down. That leads to a reduced level of certainty of profit.

In 2015, the decision was made to stop mining.

The NEW plan has been a "prospecting plan".

More to come...

- Geowizard

  
leonard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 17:03:40 WedAug 16 2017 )

I've followed your adventures for quite a few years. I've had to downscale my physical exertions and hangout with my wife so I'm looking forward to doing my latest adventures with you vicariously.

Leonard

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 20:25:44 WedAug 16 2017 )

Leonard,

Yes, I understand. Physical exertion became a limitation for me too.

Early in the process of developing the placer mining plan at Ophir, I arranged for TWO Bobcat skid-steer loaders to be moved to the mine. I had experience with a small Skid-steer loader at the Hilltop mine in Arizona. The skid-steer could perform work that was otherwise impossible. The Hilltop mine is at almost 7000 feet elevation in the Chiricahua Mountains. The Ore body is 2000 feet into the mountain. Fortunately, the mine is naturally ventilated so the Bobcat could operate underground. To be safe, I installed Carbon Monoxide sensors along the side of the adit at floor level. I never got an alarm. Tons of rock had caved in along several fault zones in the mine. All of that had to be mucked out before work could begin. Much of the muck was lead-silver ore!

I had a 763 bobcat skid-steer at my home near Cochise. I bought a new flat bed trailer and hauled the Bobcat to Seattle. In Seattle, I bought a second (reconditioned) S185 bobcat skid-steer. Both of the skid-steers were loaded onto a barge and barged up to Anchorage. Then they were airfreighted to McGrath on a NAC 737. After winter hibernation in McGrath, they were barged down the Kuskokwim River to Sterling Landing. Sterling Landing connects by road to Ophir. It was a nine hour road trip to Ophir!

Being able to lift 1000 pounds with a hydraulic "exoskeleton" and move it to a wash plant takes most of the exertion out of placer mining!

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 22:12:53 WedAug 16 2017 )


The layout of the ground at Ophir is straight forward and as might be expected. Tailing piles cover the ground on the EAST side of the creek for a length of over two and one half miles. The shale bedrock has been stripped of overburden and pay gravels pushed to a sluice. A monitor washed the gravel into the sluice. Twelve men, six on each side shoveled the gravel and occasionally ripped shale through the sluice. A dragline was positioned to load the sluice tailings and pile the tailings. The piles were developed outside of the planned forward path of mining. With a little thinking about how the dragline would have to operate, it can be seen that the dragline was positioned at a right angle to the sluice and lined up to drag the sluice tailings into the bucket and simultaneously pick up the bucket while raising and swinging the boom to the right almost 135 degrees. The dragline could only swing to the right AWAY from the men working on the sluice!

The upper bench was mined first in order to provide cleaned barren ground to deposit the tailings. The upper tailings were deposited on higher ground that had been sampled with an auger and we can assume was considered sub-economic.

A team of men were employed by the mine to auger with a Hillman Airplane drill across the creek at specified intervals. The limits of the pay was marked with a post placed in the hole at the limit on each side.

The bedrock slopes at a gentle 30 to 45 degree slope downward to the creek. Two passes were made; one about 100 feet above the creek using water from an elevated canal and a second pass was made in and along the creek including fifty to one hundred feet of bench next to the creek.

- Geowizard

  
Jim_Alaska
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 13:16:35 ThuAug 17 2017 )

Do you have the actual mine logs that contain this information, or is this all from on site observation?

It would have been fantastic to be able to access ground like that with the equipment and technology we have today.



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Jim_Alaska
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geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 14:42:20 ThuAug 17 2017 )

Jim,

Alaska has done a reasonable job of documenting the mining methods used in the early days. Reports were submitted by Field Geologists that worked for the State of Alaska. They visited mining operations and to the extent possible considering the sensitivity of "proprietary" information, details of how much muck, depth of overburden and in some cases actual amounts of GOLD recovered were reported. Ophir had a Road Commissioner employed by the Territory that kept records of production based on the amount of GOLD that was converted into merchandise at the local stores. There were initially several different mining entities. The large scale mining eventually bought out the small miners and began the process of mining the creek from one end to the other.

My investigation of the ground at Ophir has been the result of excavation of the benches. The only way to examine bedrock geology and sample bedrock for GOLD is to clear everything off - down to bedrock. My first year at Ophir was productive because I had negotiated a lease with a mining company that actually mined the tailings and remaining virgin ground. Four large cuts were made down to bedrock along an un-mined portion of the high bench. Those cuts exposed bedrock and about 1000 feet of Innoko River rock and gravel on the upper side of the cuts. The rock is well rounded fist size or smaller. The wall exposed a cross-section from bedrock surface 30 to 40 feet up to the moss covered surface.

The lessee pulled out with my investor and moved to a neighboring mine...

So, I used one of the Bobcats in 2012 to bulk sample every five feet (200 bulk samples) for most of the one thousand feet of exposed wall - cutting into the "juice" at bedrock.

There was NO GOLD.

The northern end of the wall shows bedrock rising to the surface - no alluvial rock or gravel. The southern - up stream end of the cut ends abruptly at "the bluff". That represents the end - just outside of the 160 that was under lease.

The obvious thought was that the GOLD flowed down-stream from south to north when the creek was at the higher bench level and GOLD flowed into and potentially from the structure seen at the bluff. The bluff is about 100 feet high with a glacier (solid ice) cap. The bluff is composed of iron enriched Innoko River rock that has been classified during "quiet times" over the past 10 to 30 million years. There are layers of sand. Layers of rounded gravel that look like red beans. Probably twenty or more layers of well classified sands and gravels.

I made an access road up out of the southern end of the cut to begin excavating the Bluff.

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 15:50:57 ThuAug 17 2017 )

In 2010, the lessee recovered Nuggets. The location was said to be on bedrock.

- Geowizard
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 01:07:21 Tue Nov 28 2017]

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 15:56:35 ThuAug 17 2017 )

I coined the purported area the "Nugget Patch".

Having spent another season (2013) excavating in, on and around the Nugget Patch;

I found NO GOLD.

Prospecting is a learning process. A large part of the "learning process" is learning to handle disappointment. Finding NO GOLD can be disappointing after having spent a year and thousands of dollars flying thousands of miles to Alaska.

Do you QUIT?

- Geowizard
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 17:37:51 Thu Aug 17 2017]

  
Jim_Alaska
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 01:04:05 FriAug 18 2017 )

Great information on your operation Wiz. When I was still in Alaska I read a lot of the reports you spoke about. Of course I was not considering any kind of large operation though. I just read them to get information that might help in my dredging. I also made use of the magnetometer information available at higher elevations. That information showed significant possibilities alluvial deposition in streams in the valleys I was interested in.

The streams were not seasonal, but were very small with one exception being fairly large river. Any conventional wisdom I gathered about this one river said that there was no gold in it. But that wisdom was wrong.

It just depended on where in the river you chose to mine. The lower reaches were fairly barren, with only sparse fine gold. But the upper reaches held better prospecting opportunities.

My research produced information showing turn-of-the-century mines in the headwaters that produced well. closer to the time we live in there were a few larger mechanized operations that also produced well enough to justify thier continued operation.

Gotta eat, I'll add to this later



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Jim_Alaska
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geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 14:19:15 FriAug 18 2017 )

Jim,

Thanks for adding that. Your process of doing research and doing the physical part of "prospecting" is what I am leading up to. The discussion is important. New prospectors are being born every day. We don't know who they are. They can benefit from an understanding of the experience of others and learning about the "strategy" involved in prospecting.

We are preceded by literally thousands of years of prospectors that go back to the beginning of civilization. Can we benefit from their experience? The answer is obviously, yes. Simple low cost tools are available today for anyone interested in learning how to use them for prospecting. Starting with a $20.00 GOLD pan!

My decision to prospect for GOLD in Alaska was based on what I perceived to be the continued over-reach of government into our use of lands for prospecting and potential mining. Prospecting clubs in Arizona were required to get permission from the Forest Service to go out and collect rocks. Alaska, on the other-hand was becoming more mining friendly.

When asked, "Where can I find GOLD?", I have always replied; "In a GOLD mine!. It should be obvious! Look at a topographic map and look for the location of mines. Look for GOLD mines. I followed my own advice. Knowing where there is a history of GOLD mining should improve the probability of getting into the GOLD.

Nome, Alaska is very rich in history of GOLD mining.

Availability of property;

The total property available can be thought of as a Pie. All of the pieces of the pie are controlled and/or owned by someone! So, after having done all of the initial detective work to get to Nome, Alaska, the intrepid prospector is faced with the question of "Who owns what?". The property situation around Nome is worthy of a separate thread!

Access to the property;

Well, that's another thread to think about!

Permitting;

Suction Dredging requires at a minimum, an ADFG permit in Alaska. There are limits... but at least a prospector can get onto and into water! For operations involving heavy equipment, an APMA is required.

Planning;

It requires a plan. I spent a year getting things organized for an expedition to East Beach at Nome. Planning for a Bering Sea storm that drives you OFF of the beach indefinitely needs to be part of THE PLAN!

Logistics;

Mobilization of a mining camp - even into Nome, requires attention to every detail of what moves where and when. If you plan on touching it, it better be there! Nome has become an "Animal House" from what I have heard. So, the situation has become more a matter of personal security and security of belongings. Another thread - later!

- Geowizard

  
Jim_Alaska
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 15:54:54 FriAug 18 2017 )

All good information Wiz. I was going to add to my previous post, but the rest was just a recount of what I found on this river that everyone said there was no gold worth recovering from.

I would like to show folks some information in regard to what you said about "continued over-reach of government into our use of lands for prospecting and potential mining".

I am not sure how much of this information you are personally aware of, but this information is critical to our understanding and the defense of our industry. It is especially important to new prospectors and miners that live now in states that have effectively and illegally banned mining.

Please see the attached file.



[ Attached File: HalAnthonyonMineralEstateGrant.doc - downloaded 9 times]


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Jim_Alaska
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geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 21:28:34 FriAug 18 2017 )


Thanks, Jim.

I deferred my reply over to the MEG thread. Mining rights issues deserve the focus and attention of everyone.

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 23:43:15 FriAug 18 2017 )


Early prospectors and we can assume there were MANY looked at the higher elevations.

Excavation continues.

In the past, one Bobcat was used for mining and one was used for prospecting. Prospecting has become the NEW priority. In the mean-time, if anyone has ideas on how to mine dragline tailings at a profit, feel free to chime in with your suggestions!

- Geowizard
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 01:10:11 Tue Nov 28 2017]

  
Jim_Alaska
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 06:14:47 SatAug 19 2017 )

Don't forget that the gold could also have come from bedrock exposures in the creek, or where the creek cut through an ancient channel.

Have fun, hopefully profitable fun.



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Jim_Alaska
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geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 13:02:20 SatAug 19 2017 )

Jim,

From several papers written in recent years on the subject of GOLD deposit models in the Tintina Gold Province, a belt that runs from the Yukon thru Ophir and Donlin, well defined number of intrusive related ((IR) models have been developed.

From papers written by experts on the Geology of Ophir and the surrounding area, including much of Alaska, the placer GOLD deposits are the product of Monzonite and/or Quartz Dikes and Sills. I have exposed both of those types of intrusive.

Prospecting is a process of elimination and the process of elimination eventually WILL lead to a conclusion!

- Geowizard
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 01:13:06 Tue Nov 28 2017]

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 13:36:24 SatAug 19 2017 )


2017 was an important year at Ophir.

The information gathered through continued excavation of bedrock and continued sampling ELIMINATED the possibility of GOLD originating from a higher elevation.

Knowledge of and understanding the nature of the GOLD deposit is imperative to advance any GOLD mine.

It aint easy!

Prospecting is time consuming and costly. It tests the internal resolve of a human being to continue in the face of uncertainty and consistently finding NO GOLD. Overcoming discouraging results and moving forward in a methodical manner eventually WILL lead to a conclusion.

What's next?

When a GOLD mine goes through the prospecting phase, the prospecting reaches a point where physical metal in the ground can be measured. The actual location of the GOLD remains unknown!

Prospectors, today, use modern methods including Geophysical methods. The Geophysical survey conducted by the State of Alaska in 2010 and released in 2012, represents a reconnaissance view of the structure and conductivity of the rocks in the Iditarod Mining District. The survey requires follow-up ground surveys to pinpoint the exact locations of mineral enrichment. They're buried beneath bedrock and exposed in the creek. The strike of the Monzonite and Quartz intrusives crosses the creek at certain locations and those locations will be mapped and sampled.

The preferred Geophysical method in this case is a large Pulse Induction (PI) system referred to as Time Domain EM (TDEM). A transmitter coil having a diameter of 10 Meters is laid out on the ground. It sends a magnetic "pulse" into the ground. It operates just like a conventional Minelab or equivalent PI metal detector. Conductive ore bodies are detected with a receiver coil. Because the magnetic pulse travels into the ground and generates a secondary response over a period of time, the depth to an ore body can also be estimated. A 30 Meter loop can detect to a depth of approximately 100 feet. Greater depth is obtained with a more powerful and larger loop 100 Meters or more in diameter.

Drilling is the next phase after Ground Geophysics.

Once it is determined that conductive mineralization is present, and the depth can be estimated, drilling can be used to remove physical samples of the ore body. In this case, there may be numerous ore bodies.

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 14:41:17 SatAug 19 2017 )

Operating Solo;

For the most part, I operate ALONE. I had a visitor for part of the season this year. He was very helpful. He is a member and occasional contributor to this forum. He may self-identify if he wishes to.

Is prospecting "FUN"?

No. I don't want anyone to associate "prospecting" with "fun". It isn't a product that I/we sell. It is a service that a very few people are willing to provide. Prospecting can be done personally or as a service that is sold to others.

Much has been written and said about prospecting. I have had visitors that have come and gone at Ophir. They tell me that;

"Prospecting and mining has to be fun!".

NOPE!

Prospecting takes Energy (aka WORK), Money and Time. All of these are limited resources that are USED - they are expended and then they are GONE.

This isn't meant to be a lecture! It's your "Dutch Uncle" sitting down with you to explain the reality and practicality of the matter of prospecting.

If you don't expect to have fun - you won't have the added disappointment of "Hell, I didn't even have any fun!".

Did you have fun? Nope. Find any GOLD? Nope!

Are you Quitten? Nope!

- Geowizard

  
micropedes1
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 14:52:28 SunAug 20 2017 )

I was the "visitor". I was there seeking a better understanding of EM analysis as it pertains to gold locations. I can tell you that even with degrees in mathematics, chemistry, and physics that it is daunting to understand EM analysis. More on that later.

I was also trying to get a feel for the mines in the area. It requires "boots on the ground" and helpful insights from a good friend. Possible future mining development. Once better acquainted with the local mines it is easier to develop a potential mining plan.

Lastly, I spent some time pulling wrenches on old mining equipment with an eye toward putting it back in service. Just because it is old doesn't mean it cannot still be used.

And lest I forget, we did verify that there was still some gold present.

  
Jim_Alaska
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 23:03:26 SunAug 20 2017 )

What a hoot that must have been; two old farts and old mining equipment. It conjures up interesting pictures in my mind. :devil:



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Jim_Alaska
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WmA
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 05:27:43 MonAug 21 2017 )

Thank's Geo...
This is an excellent thread. Rarely is the reality of what it really takes to get the gold discussed.
I truly hope all your efforts are richly rewarded.

.
Jim.... Glad to see the site back up.

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 13:14:50 MonAug 21 2017 )

Thanks, Guys!

One of the pieces of equipment that made everything possible at Ophir during the period from 1938 to around 1960 was a Caterpillar Dozer. It's a D7 Cable Dozer. The Dozer was parked in the late 1950's as the price of GOLD remained around $35 and the cost of mining exceeded the value of the GOLD recovered.

The Dozer has a Pony Motor that is used to start the diesel engine. The Pony Motor is a relatively simple, two cylinder gasoline engine with a transmission and clutch. Like many things that sit around exposed to the weather and scavengers, the carburetor was removed and the joints in the starter transmission and starter clutch needed a little lubrication and loosening. These old starter motors also have a magneto ignition system. The magneto was checked and needs a condenser. So, with a few minor parts, the Dozer could be a functional piece of equipment.

Last season, the S185 Bobcat blew a hydraulic line near the end of the season. So, when I came up this season, and Glen arrived, we replaced the Hydraulic line and got the Bobcat going again.

The road from Ophir to Takotna was impassable during the early part of the season. The road follows the Innoko River and a portion of the road was taken out by a mud slide. The road crew managed to fill in the road bed but the road was still impassable. Eventually that was fixed. Logistics at Ophir depends on getting supplies from Takotna. I can fly freight, parts, food, etc into into Takotna on the scheduled commuter flight. Takotna has a Post Office but it was closed two months and eventually they opened it up once a week so people could get their mail.

Living off-the-grid;

We take things like electricity for granted - living on the grid. For anyone that decides that they are going to live off the grid, you need a source of electricity. I have gone through three generators. They simply wear out after a couple of years. The recently purchased Generac Generator had about 200 hours on it when it failed. Last season, I had installed two 100 watt solar panels with controller to charge several 12 volt deep cycle batteries. The battery pack drives a couple of 500 watt inverters. The inverters convert 12 volts (DC) into 120 volts (AC). The advance planning paid off when the generator failed. Since it's almost impossible to survive without internet access, I have always maintained a broadband satellite internet capability. Each season, when I come through Anchorage, I stop in at the dealer and check out the satellite modem. Starband went out of business so the new provider is Exede. There isn't cel phone or other communication out in the bush. So, it requires a satellite dish installation. The computer and satellite modem, dish all runs on solar power.

The Generator needed a new set of brushes. I flew out at the end of June to get brushes and supplies. Flew back in about the 4th of July.

Prospecting went into full speed. I excavated and exposed bedrock over several thousand square feet of the lower bench. The lower bench was of great interest because the bedrock had been mined extensively. The bench was filled with about six feet of mud. Because this season was relatively dry, the mud had dried sufficiently to be able to load it and take it out to a nearby dump site. Exposing bedrock on the lower bench enabled access to the extension of the broad monzonite intrusive that extends from the bluff for over 1000 feet south west toward and intersecting Ophir Creek.

- Geowizard
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 15:13:14 Tue Aug 22 2017]

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 13:22:27 ThuAug 31 2017 )

Ophir is a GOLD mine;

Having produced 70,000 ounces of GOLD, this mine has a a proven track record. Placer GOLD production extended over a distance of several miles. The proof is in the remaining Dragline Tailing piles. The GOLD was found in the form of NUGGETS and small GOLD. There is a marginally mineable amount of GOLD remaining in the tailings.

The other potential for GOLD production at Ophir is Hard Rock;

Exploration of the ground at Ophir has provided insight to where there is NO GOLD. Research on "Deposit Models" helps in understanding how GOLD deposits have formed along the Tintina Gold Province that extends from the Yukon Territory in Canada beyond Ophir to Donlin and Shotgun. Recent papers have been written that provide an up-to-date understanding of the geological processes that have been at work in the earth.

- Geowizard
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 01:16:03 Tue Nov 28 2017]

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 14:25:49 ThuAug 31 2017 )

What is the Deposit Model?

A good reference on Deposit Models is a paper having the Title;

"Exploration Models for Late Cretaceous Intrusion-Related Gold Deposits in Alaska and the Yukon Territory, Canada" Written by Brian Flanigan, Curt Freeman, Rainer Newberry, Dan McCoy, Craig Hart.

Papers written on the subject can help in the process of exploration for GOLD. There are certain characteristics of each Deposit Model that distinguish one from another.

- Geowizard

  
geowizard
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Re: Ophir 2017 ( 14:36:01 FriSep 1 2017 )

Prospecting and Deposit Models;

The benefit of prospecting is using the power of observation to view bedrock geology and formulate conclusions on the geologic setting.

During Cretaceous time, Alaska was submerged under a sea that covered a vast area. The oceanic tidal movement eroded sediments that formed much of the underlying bedrock seen today known as the Kuskokwim sandstone / siltstone in the area covering most of the Iditarod Mining District. Late Cretaceous time also was a period of volcanism. Volcanic activity continued into Early Tertiary time - as recent as 23 Million Years ago (Ma). Continental Drift and related Tectonic Plate movement resulted in bending of the crust of the earth. Those forces created fractures and fault systems that range from the Yukon in Canada to Western Alaska.

- Geowizard
[1 edits; Last edit by geowizard at 14:38:53 Fri Sep 1 2017]

  

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